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alienvampire
06-08-2003, 11:33 PM
Today, I played in a tournament that what held in a room that I had never before visited. After playing for about 30 minutes to warm up, I had my first match. The tables, I found, were playing very fast, and the balls had a tendency to slide.

What is the best way to adjust to conditions like this? A few times today, I felt that my patterns were being changed to accomodate the equipment. It was uncomfortable.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

marek
06-09-2003, 04:56 AM
Hi!
My experience tells me that while playing on fast tables positioning of the cb into smaller angles + usage of less power is highly advisable.
Good luck!

alienvampire
06-09-2003, 10:42 AM
With all due respect, I was looking for something more than "hit the ball softer."

UWPoolGod
06-09-2003, 10:49 AM
With all due respect, I was looking for something more than "hit the ball softer." <--alien

What else do you want to hear? If the table is playing fast you either have to hit it softer to make your desired shot happen, or you have to choose a different pocket for the OB and hit it harder. Sucks to have to play that way, but some times it is the only option. I hate playing with high rails so the CB flings off the rail, hard to control the ball then so I find that playing for different pockets is usually the key.

Todd

Wally_in_Cincy
06-09-2003, 10:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote alienvampire:</font><hr> With all due respect, I was looking for something more than "hit the ball softer." <hr /></blockquote>

Sounded like pretty good advice. Then again you could have used your alien vampire skills to suck the lifeblood from your opponents /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Wally~~just trying to help /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

UWPoolGod
06-09-2003, 10:55 AM
As far as the skidding aspect of the balls goes, I have no idea. What makes this happen? Too much chalk dust on the table, not tight enough simonis, worn/new cloth?

Todd

Qtec
06-09-2003, 11:12 AM
First of all you have to accept that you will play on tables that have different speeds. You have to be able to adapt.Ther is no easy answer to this ,but here is one option.
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%_b6K1%`d1H4%ag5C1
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You are potting the 1 into pocket D. Lets say that on your club table you can play the QB to A. On the fast table you will come to B. You can play the shot differently and by taking the QB to C . This way you achieve the same position and you dont have to play softer.
My advice is ;
Play with the table, dont play against it. All you have to do is accept it and you will naturally adapt.


Qtec

RedHell
06-09-2003, 01:06 PM
As you mentionned, the objective is to adjust, therefore you will have to change something in your game. Here what I do, fast table: I use a shorter bridge than usual. Having a shorter stroke will reduce the speed of my natural stroke. I also try to go back to basics. Try not to move the CB as much because I can't predict how the table will react. As you get to feel more comfortable, you will instinctivily start moving the CB more.

Other than that I would suggest to keep your focus, and observe what your doing, make sure you notice, if your longer, how much longer you are so that you can keep adjusting.

SpiderMan
06-09-2003, 01:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote alienvampire:</font><hr> With all due respect, I was looking for something more than "hit the ball softer." <hr /></blockquote>

Alien,

He said more than "hit the ball softer". You apparently missed the excellent piece of advice he gave you in the first half of his statement:

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Marek:</font><hr>
Hi!
My experience tells me that while playing on fast tables positioning of the cb into smaller angles + usage of less power is highly advisable.
Good luck!<hr /></blockquote>

What he is saying is that, on fast tables, try playing position to leave less angle (slightly more straight in) on your cut shots. Then when you hit at any speed the cueball will move move sideways along the tangent line slower than before because the fuller hit transfers more of the KE to the object ball. This will help keep you from over-rolling your position.

I don't think English is Marek's first language, so hopefully I haven't misinterpreted what he was trying to say. Anyway, my interpretation of his advice is what I'd say also /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan

Predator314
06-09-2003, 01:59 PM
I was playing the other day on some bar tables that were slow and had really bouncy rails. There's not much you could do in this situation other than try to keep the cue ball in the middle of the table and use the rails as little as possible.

I then (in the same tournament) shot on a great playing bar table the rolled just a little bit quicker than lightning. I love playing on fast tables. I don't really hit the ball softer as most have suggested (all though you have to in a lot of cases). I use less english. By hitting the cue ball more towards the center, you won't draw your ball 6 feet more than intended or follow the cue ball into the pocket.

RedHell
06-09-2003, 02:28 PM
My nightmare of table was on some old Pallason. Hyperfast clothe and dead rail. Everytime I was taking position off a draw or a follow I was too long. As I adjusted slowly, I started realising that everytime my positionning involved a rail I was too short. I struggled until I realised that for clean positionning (no rail involved) I had to play the shots half as long as usual and for shots involving rails, twice as long as usual. After that everything was fine. It's all about ajustement.

MarkUrsel
06-09-2003, 02:43 PM
If you were playing at Amsterdam in the Tristate event, the tables are Brunswick Gold Crowns with Simonis 860 cloth. Those are very fast tables indeed, and the rails are pretty lively.

Best advice I can think of is to practice shots that make you move the cue ball around and try to get used to the speed of the table. Try cutting a shot down the long rail and running the cue ball to the far short rail and back again:
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)END

Try the long-table version of that shot as well, along with some "lag-for-break" shots. After all of that, you should have a good feel for the speed and rails.

Mark &lt;--went 2 and out at that same tournament...3 weeks of not playing took its toll /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Qtec
06-09-2003, 03:01 PM
[ QUOTE ]
What he is saying is that, on fast tables, try playing position to leave less angle (slightly more straight in) on your cut shots. Then when you hit at any speed the cueball will move move sideways along the tangent line slower than before because the fuller hit transfers more of the KE to the object ball. This will help keep you from over-rolling your position <hr /></blockquote>

Ths is considered as a general rule, but how can you do this if you have no control over the CB .This is a solution ,but is also the problem .I dont think this will help him.

Qtec.

SpiderMan
06-09-2003, 03:21 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
What he is saying is that, on fast tables, try playing position to leave less angle (slightly more straight in) on your cut shots. Then when you hit at any speed the cueball will move move sideways along the tangent line slower than before because the fuller hit transfers more of the KE to the object ball. This will help keep you from over-rolling your position <hr /></blockquote>

Ths is considered as a general rule, but how can you do this if you have no control over the CB .This is a solution ,but is also the problem .I dont think this will help him.

Qtec. <hr /></blockquote>

Doing this is one thing that helps give me more control over the CB. Obviously you have to work yourself in line to begin with, but in general easing up just a little on the amount of angle you leave will help keep the CB under control.

SpiderMan

tateuts
06-09-2003, 03:25 PM
If you vary your play and practice between different rooms, and different tables within those rooms, you will be able to adapt to different tables and conditions faster.

I've often marveled that road players can walk in a room and get the hang of a table right away. They've also table-proofed their games by playing shape a certain way.

Golfers have to deal with this all the time. I'll never forget a quote from a PGA golfer. He was asked why club pros, as good as they are, almost never win or place in the big open events. He said "they may be shooting 67 on their home course week after week, but when they have to play new courses under tournament conditions, with fast greens and tucked pin placements, they can't compete with touring pro's, because we do it week after week.


Chris

Wally_in_Cincy
06-10-2003, 06:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tateuts:</font><hr> If you vary your play and practice between different rooms, and different tables within those rooms, you will be able to adapt to different tables and conditions faster.....

<hr /></blockquote>

That's a great point. In "The Straight Pool Bible" Arthur Cranfeld suggests the same thing. He says it's great to have a home table for practice but in order to be the best you can be you must play on as many different tables as possible.

Heck, Scott Lee plays on a diffent table every day /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Ralph S.
06-10-2003, 07:07 AM
The advice that Marek gave seems very sound to me. Like Spiderman said, there is more said there than just shoot softer. One thing that I might add, would be to play your position to try and use a stop shot as often as possible.

Terry
06-10-2003, 07:43 AM
Something I do at home is practice sinking balls at pocket speed ( ball just falls of the edge of the pocket), the results from this exercise is that shooting soft does not bother me. Sometimes if you want to shoot firm but don't want the cueball to take off you can use the kill shot. When I go to a tournament in another town or even my own town I always warmup by my self. I start with dead on shot's ( firm ), it helps get MY stroke going. I will then shoot angels down the rails and open table angles to get the feel of the table speed and pockets. Terry

marek
06-12-2003, 04:38 AM
Yes spiderman!
English is NOT my first language. In fact I try to use as little English as possible.......on the pool table..... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
You were absolutelly right with your interpretation of my statement, couldnt be better.
Cya!

Qtec
06-12-2003, 06:34 AM
Spiderman , i know what you mean ,and it is good advice but it seems to me he cant get into position in the first place .I look at this way, if i know the QB is going to travel at least 3 ft,and this leaves me with a thin cut , i can use 2 rails instead of 1. The QB still travels 3 ft but i am still in position.

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Qtec.