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View Full Version : Finely tuned draw



06-13-2003, 10:57 AM
The Jacksonville Experiment post was very interesting. The information regarding lack of cue acceleration through the cueball is something I have been passing on for years, nice to have it proved. With regard to the draw shot by Corey and Alex, this is an example of "touch" with the cueball. Very simply the cueball must be moving forward slowly, but spinning backwards at contact. It can be done "easily", but requires "touch". The effect would be similar to spinning a hula hoop on edge across carpet. Spin the hoop in a backward motion, with forward force. The hoop will go forward, then come back. No matter how much backspin you put on it, if you throw it forward too hard, it will never get back to you. Same on the described shot. The key is to have the ball spinning backwards, with as little forward motion as possible. The "acceleration" principle comes into play here. The more hand force on the cue at impact transfers to forward momentum on cueball. The stick must be in midair at the strike point,(no hand contact) which will give you maximum "stoppage" of the cue.Conside that it takes not much force to hit the object ball and have it bank back. The hit must be extremely precise, at the threshold of miscueing, to impart maximum spin. A big key also is to hit slightly downward, for this seems to shave off more forward momentum as compared to the retardation of spin...be careful to avoid any hop. Now it is touch. The cueball must have the least forward momentum at impact, to start the object ball as slowly as possible. I would be surprised if Efren is not a master of this shot, for to me he "feels" the cueball better than most. The other option is to use a lighter cueball...lol.

NBC-BOB
06-13-2003, 11:22 AM
Well this is something that I've struggled with for years.Although I'm able to draw the cue, the length of the table without a problem, I know my draw would be stronger,if I had more forward follow through and was hitting the cueball dead center,when I apply draw.I can see the cueball, spinning back with a slight angle and it kills my draw.I've played and watched Mike Massey draw the cueball back and haven't seen to many people that can equal his draw stroke.I've often wondered if it's due to his big forearms and the forward follow through?

06-13-2003, 11:56 AM
People always comment on strong followthrough. I think this is absolute malarkey. It is simply cue speed at impact. Your cue is no longer in contact after a split second. As to Mr. Massey, stronger wrists and forearms would allow for quicker cue speed, so I agree it would translate into better draw. Myself I am challenged to arm wrestles all the time, and very rarely lose, except to a very technical wrestler. It is from 27,000 hrs of cueing, and its effect on my wrist and forearm.

06-14-2003, 01:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote NBC-BOB:</font><hr> Well this is something that I've struggled with for years.Although I'm able to draw the cue, the length of the table without a problem, I know my draw would be stronger,if I had more forward follow through and was hitting the cueball dead center,when I apply draw.I can see the cueball, spinning back with a slight angle and it kills my draw.I've played and watched Mike Massey draw the cueball back and haven't seen to many people that can equal his draw stroke.I've often wondered if it's due to his big forearms and the forward follow through? <hr /></blockquote>


Strength has nothing to do with this, it's all technique, observe Massey's main draw shot, the circular draw, there is zero follow through, none.
The Ice Mon