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UTAddb
06-16-2003, 07:28 PM
All the time I see players who have this short, jerky stroke in their pre-shot routine where they'll bring the cue back and forth across a span of about 1 or 2 inches faster than I can blink. They'll probably have about 20 mini strokes before they hit. I don't see how you could have a accurate stroke with this style. Are there any successful players that have this type of pre-shot routine?

06-17-2003, 12:30 AM
Sure, how about the man who's is regarded by many as the greatest 9 ball player of all time, Whimpy Lassiter, how about one of the greatest l4.1 players of all time, Allen Hopkins, Mike Sigel, shall I go on.
The Ice Mon

Sid_Vicious
06-17-2003, 07:12 AM
I believe you said once that you are in the Dallas area, or are moving here soon. If and when you find yourself watching a player we have here, named TJ Davis, watch the blur of short warm up strokes he has. I understand TJ took the top rung in Vegas a few years back in the singles, so I'd qualify him as "any successful players that have this type of pre-shot routine." sid

Scott Lee
06-17-2003, 07:41 AM
Dustin...Allan Hopkins has a pre-shot stroke like that. I showed you the CORRECT way...watch the tape.

Scott

bluewolf
06-17-2003, 09:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Dustin...Allan Hopkins has a pre-shot stroke like that. I showed you the CORRECT way...watch the tape.

Scott <hr /></blockquote>

I have had very good stroke instruction. IMO, that is where it starts. There are those who have gone off on a rhythm of their own. That is undeniable. i cannot compare me to anybody else, really.

ww says stuff about how many fingers to grip with. Me, I grab hold of the stick however it is comfortable,as long as it isnt tight, which makes my hand hurt anyway.

I have heard so many theories of ways to do preshots and seen just about as many. Me, I do it by what feels right. My preshot on the more delicate shots is not the same as it is on the shorter or easier ones. I do try to do correctly what scott taught me in whatever number I do, but have found a joy and freedom in being me and not as much analyzing everything.The joy is in the stroke more than how many balls go in.

I have seen lots of players use those choppy preshots that were very good. I dont even notice it anymore except that someone brought it up here. It works for them. Fine.

Laura

06-17-2003, 08:03 PM
You are right sid, I now live in Dallas, got transfered here. I've seen you play, I've seen you gamble, like i said, you need lessons from Scott Lee bad boy.
The Ice Mon

Chris Cass
06-17-2003, 10:09 PM
Geez,

C.C.

Chris Cass
06-17-2003, 10:16 PM
Hi UTAddb,

I just resently watched a tape with a Mr. Lee from China I believe that took 29 short strokes to make a billiard. He was I'm sure aiming precisely the spot and mostly thinking of all the things most people think about while standing, in their preshot routine. JMO

Regards,

C.C.~~ /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

nAz
06-17-2003, 10:55 PM
naz

bluewolf
06-18-2003, 05:18 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote gna:</font><hr> You are right sid, I now live in Dallas, got transfered here. I've seen you play, I've seen you gamble, like i said, you need lessons from Scott Lee bad boy.
The Ice Mon <hr /></blockquote>

If sid is in or near texas, perhaps randy gs pool school would be better, no offense to scott.

bw

NBC-BOB
06-18-2003, 11:20 AM
I've seen some great players over the years with some real odd ball fundamentals, so I guess it's the finish that counts.I watched a player, who had polio, and thought everytime he took a shot, he was going to fall.But he sure could run racks!

phil in sofla
06-18-2003, 03:32 PM
Two related examples come to mind.

Jimmy Reid has a 'fast and loose' part of the pre-stroke routine he uses and advocates, which is a period of rapid sawing back and forth, sort of to loosen up or get limber, while you're setting into your stance, checking your balance, etc. These aren't so much little jerking motions as rather very fast, partial strokes. Then, after a little of this, he advocates a more traditional 3, 4, or 5 full classic practice strokes, before you pull the trigger.

A local semi-pro player, who's semi-retired now from playing to concentrate on his cue making, Dennis Searing, had a little jerky hitch in his first couple of addresses at the ball, more like what it sounds you are describing, before he also settled down to a more classic set of practice strokes.

Many, many players do mostly short feathering strokes at the cue ball address, with or without fuller more classic practice strokes.