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View Full Version : Inconsistency vs. "Gettin' the Rolls"



Wally_in_Cincy
03-29-2002, 12:52 PM
After reading the "Rate Yourself" thread I noticed many people said "I play like a "B" some days and a "D" other days" or words to that effect.

I have some days that are better than others but I am actually pretty consistent in the quality of my play. (OK-consistently mediocre). The difference to me is "Getting the rolls". I contend that when you think you are playing bad it has a lot to do with luck and when you are playing well it also has a lot to do with luck.

Maybe it's just that at my level of play I don't notice the subtle differences in my game on a given day.

Anyone care to share their thoughts about this?

Tom_In_Cincy
03-29-2002, 02:38 PM
Wally,
The best I can explain it (from my experiences) is that one day I can be mentally up for competion.. and other days, my brain can't handle remembering how to get to the pool hall..

stickman
03-29-2002, 03:08 PM
At my level, there are definitely days when I play better than others. Aside from that there is also what you refer to as getting the rolls. When I have a particularly good outing, I have shot good and gotten the luck of the rolls. There are times also when I haven't shot necessarily poor, but manage to hook myself behind the only other ball on the table. Sometimes 1/4" is the difference between a good outing and a bad one.

03-29-2002, 07:38 PM
At my level too stickman. I mean to say that it gets really cruel to either the other guy or myself depending on how the day is going for the respective lucky or unlucky rolls. Sure, the CB goes where you send it, still to miss a shot and then clamber into traffic and jam up the opponent on a relentless basis is simply wonderful, and yes, the opposite is a bitch! Ain't pool a hoot to play!?!?!? sid

03-29-2002, 08:06 PM
The break shot aside, I suspect that 'good' players (A players and above) tend to make their own luck in most cases while 'bad' players (B+ and below) depend often upon their 'lucking' into a properly executed shot and leave. In other words, the effect luck has on a player's match decreases as his or her skill level rises. The better the player the less they need 'good rolls,' or luck, to win.

For most players, mediocrity is the norm, and luck, whether 'bad' or 'good,' does determine whether they play well or not. For the mediocre player, exceptional days, whether good or bad, are those days when things go right or wrong much of the time. They are a matter of luck.

Steve

Q-guy
03-29-2002, 08:35 PM
You are right. It is most noticeable when watching a match then playing yourself. A match may end in a lopsided score and look like a massacre. When in fact you could have changed just a few rolls during the game and it would have been just as lopsided the other way. This is the problem in giving up a spot. The final score may not really reflect what is a fair game. A guy loses and wants a spot and may not need it at all. That is just the way the game went. When you say no they think you are a "Nit." They just don't know how to really handicap the game. Now here is the worst part, they may have quit a winning game and will never know it. They walk away a loser and didn't have to.

Q-guy
03-29-2002, 08:49 PM
The real thing about luck is the better the player the more they do with even the smallest amount of luck. It is not the lucky shot that hurts, it all the shots they make after it. A weaker player may be lucky but doesn't do anything with it. In fact they never even seem to notice the good rolls they are getting. They just keep screwing everything up and think everybody is just luckier then them.

03-29-2002, 10:12 PM
Yep, for me, seeing a strong player make a low percentage shot and then getting the leave they need is akin to watching my paycheck bounce -- I really know I'm in deep trouble! At least with weak players one can always hope that they will get a bit manic and then miss the hanger they have in front of them!

Steve

cheesemouse
03-30-2002, 12:22 AM
Q-guy,
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote:</font><hr>The real thing about luck is the better the player the more they do with even the smallest amount of luck. It is not the lucky shot that hurts, it all the shots they make after it.<hr></blockquote>

I agree with this statement to the max. Then you add what the better player does with the other players mistakes and you have what is effectionately called a jam-up player. What do you suppose that term refers too, anyway??....In regards to making your own luck I think if your decision making is good you get luckier when you miss then say the guy who has bad shot selection and bad speed when he misses.

Cuemage
03-30-2002, 12:24 AM
I played a guy tonight who lucked 3 consecutive balls in...then missed...musta felt guilty

BTW, I rarely get rolls when shooting b/c I know right where the cueball is going. The onlys rolls I seem to get are when a ball rattles,then leaves my opponent a tough shot

The Cuemage

stickman
03-30-2002, 12:43 AM
Decision making does contribute to one's luck. A good friend of mine is an excellent 9 ball player. Like most he still gets hooked from time to time. What appears to be luck is actually based on some good decision making. He always preaches to me that if you have to kick at a ball, kick hard, and if you have no shot roll as many balls as you can. He is lucky, but there is some strategy behind it. Don't get me wrong, he is not a slop shooter and will run out over shooting a combo on the nine, but when there isn't a shot, he uses his head. Defensive shots don't figure in because we play ring games a lot.

Rod
03-30-2002, 02:05 AM
I definately agree with your friend. We play some ring games also on a bar box. It is an honest effort, but if you foul the next player can make you shoot again. A guy asked me to shoot again last night. There was 4 or 5 balls, in the area but no real shot on the next ball except a double kiss. I could see at least 4 balls moving on the shot, which happened and I lucked one in. I asked him when he racked for me, why didn't you shoot that. His answer was he didn't feel lucky. Depending on the shot, I don't like to pass up a clear shot on a bar table in a ring game. Odds are it will not come back around if I do.

stickman
03-30-2002, 10:42 AM
Sounds like our ring games. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif If you don't make the most of your opportunities, you're just contributing.