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SRAlford
06-19-2003, 09:32 AM
Greetings all!
Brand new member here. I've just ordered a 9' Olhausen table and have been looking at lights to go along with it. I'm set on getting a 3 or 4 lamp style light - rather than a tiffany box.

My question is since the playing surface is 100" long - should I get a 4 lamp rather than 3? The 3 lamps I've seen are usually 54" or 60". And most of the 4 lamp are 73". I'm guessing I'd need the extra coverage of the 4 lamp?

I've seen posts about the Diamond Lighting System; while it looks fanastic - its both too expensive and too bulkly for my needs. I'm trying to stay in the $300-$400 range.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions!
Steve

highsea
06-19-2003, 09:40 AM
Absolutely go with the longer light if you are set on incandescents.

The diamond light is really nice, but yea, pricey. Have you looked at other flourescent fixtures?

-CM

SRAlford
06-19-2003, 09:57 AM
Thanks for your reply CM!
I guess I haven't come across any other florescent fixtures than the Diamond system. Know any good web sites to check for these?

highsea
06-19-2003, 10:20 AM
I'll do some looking around and post here if I find anything. One of the PH's I go to uses a metal light with I think 3 or 4 tubes in it. It is rather industrial looking, but it works very well. If you have any woodworking skills, it wouldn't be difficult to dress one of these up with a wood frame that matches your table.

Another thing you might consider is to talk to a local cabinetmaker. They have all the tools necessary to to a first class job, and the electrical components could be purchased cheaply from Grainger or some other industrial supply. Just sketch up the shade you want built, and put it together yourself.

I've never seen any pool lights that use a combination of flourescents and incandescents, but I think that would work well also. I have a drafting light that is like that. It has an incandescent bulb in the center, surrounded by a flourescent ring. It produces a very nice white light with no flicker, and is easy on the eyes. The shade is about 15 or 16 inches in diameter, I guess. I think 4 of those in setup a fixture would make a pretty decent table light also.

If you do go with an incandescent fixture, use full spectrum bulbs.

-CM

smfsrca
06-19-2003, 11:29 AM
I mounted two 8 foot flourescent strips from Home Depot directly to the 8 foot ceiling in my poolroom. I then built a wooden box around the fixtures using 1" x 10" boards.

http://www.homedepot.com/cmc_upload/HDUS/EN_US/asset/images/eplus/324729_3.jpg

bolo
06-19-2003, 12:29 PM
Consider either doing one yourself. If you don't have the woodworking skill, design what you want and have a local woodworker build you something. I had a local man build one for me. I showed him some pictures of what was out there and what they cost. He could not believe how much they cost. I got one built from stained cherry, my design and I supplied the light fixture for $150. and it is beautiful + it is one of a kind. For light I used 6 foot four strips. It seems to be perfect for a 9 foot pool table. The ones 8 foot I thought were too long and did not look as good. 4 foot are just too short to give proper light. Something to think about.

Rod
06-19-2003, 12:50 PM
The 4 lamp incandescent will work well with the right bulbs. A pool room here only uses 3 but they are hung individually from the celing so they can be spaced far enough apart. You don't have that option since they are in a fixed position on a long rod.

A friend of mine bought 2 four foot 4 lamp florescent lights from Home Depot. He attached them in the center and used 3 chains to hang from the celing. They lit up the table very well. They did however put off a fair amount of side light. I think to do it right you should have someone build a custom wood frame so it's directed down and not out. Much more pleasing on the eyes.

Rod

SRAlford
06-19-2003, 01:44 PM
Thanks to everyone who has posted with ideas!

The DIY box is a great idea, I would have to work with a carpenter as I don't have the required tools/machinery.

Has anyone tried using 'compact fluorescent bulbs'? They are small spiral fluorescents that screw into a standard incandescent slot. I've seen these in both 'soft' and 'cool' white (daylight). Here is a link to an example: Compact Fluorescent Bulb (http://www.bulbs.com/products/product_detail.asp?page=products&inventory=9511)

Think something like that might work if I'm stuck with using a 4 lamp bar light?
Steve

pooltchr
06-19-2003, 01:46 PM
I don't remember if it came from Home Depot or Lowe's, but I got a standard wood finish box frame light fixture with 4 flourscent tubes. I anchored chains into the ceiling and suspended the light from the chains. Looks not unlike the diamond lights, and I think the whole thing was about 100 bucks.

Pizza Bob
06-19-2003, 01:59 PM
Yes, a local poolroom here, uses either the flourescent replacements for incandescent bulbs or halogen - not sure which, but they do provide better light than regular incandescent if you're stuck using that type of fixture. I PM'ed you about another alternative also.

Adios,

Pizza Bob

The Watchdog
06-20-2003, 01:16 AM
It seems all the posts refer to flourescent fixtures, while your question was regarding 3 and 4 lamp styles. Or maybe I am the one out to lunch. There is no doubt you should go with the 4 lamp fixture, it allows lower wattages per lamp, and provides more even lighting.

Be careful if you are tall, however, the standard suggest mounting height off the table may be a bit too low at the racking end as you bend over the table. With the extra lamp, however, it will be no problem to raise the fixture a few inches and not lose light.

John in NH
06-21-2003, 08:10 PM
Hi Steve,

If you think the diamond light is too expensive and you want a 4 lamp vs a 3, you might consider browsing EBAY, I'm sure that you can find something within the $300 or $400 price range.

Good Luck.

John

SecaucusFats
06-21-2003, 09:18 PM
If you're going to use fluorescent lamps, spend a little more and get the 'daylight balanced' ones. You'll see better, and you'll have less eyestrain from the light.

Fats

06-22-2003, 01:24 AM
yo fat man, you make a post over there that was wrong, Gorina does not shave their cloth which is why it has a wave in it, Only simonis does, which is why its better. I bet you sell the Gornina dont you. Are you a 9 baller dude?

Flourescent lights have 4 times the light spread of incandescent, you can have all the light you want. A 40 watt bulb is equal to 200 watts of incandescent, less heat, less energy and money to operate.
You want to know what a pool light should look like, go into a office, they are all in the ceiling, you dont see pool hall lights hung down low over the desks. Go to home depot, you are outthe door 2/3rd's less than those expensive pool hall lights. If you cant recess them in the ceiling, then just attach them to the ceiling. Every watch the pros play in those big convention halls, they have no lights over the tables, the over head lights are just fine, and they are 100' up in the air. Having a light right over the table is dumb.
The ice mon

SecaucusFats
06-22-2003, 08:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote gna:</font><hr> yo fat man, you make a post over there that was wrong, Gorina does not shave their cloth which is why it has a wave in it, Only simonis does, which is why its better. I bet you sell the Gornina dont you. Are you a 9 baller dude?

Flourescent lights have 4 times the light spread of incandescent, you can have all the light you want. A 40 watt bulb is equal to 200 watts of incandescent, less heat, less energy and money to operate.
You want to know what a pool light should look like, go into a office, they are all in the ceiling, you dont see pool hall lights hung down low over the desks. Go to home depot, you are outthe door 2/3rd's less than those expensive pool hall lights. If you cant recess them in the ceiling, then just attach them to the ceiling. Every watch the pros play in those big convention halls, they have no lights over the tables, the over head lights are just fine, and they are 100' up in the air. Having a light right over the table is dumb.
The ice mon <hr /></blockquote>

I don't sell anything related to pool or billiards, and I am also not involved in any business aspect of either.

Gorina and Simonis are both excellent choices. I have never detected any waviness in Gorina cloth. Balls will roll just as true with Gorina Basalt, or Tournament 2000, as they will with Simonis 860, or 760. Both cloths are shaved this is done to remove any slubs and fuzzies. In fact, all high quality worsted wool undergoes this step, including the worsted wool used for fine quality clothing.

9 Ball ranks at the very bottom of my list. I much prefer 14.1 (Straight), Banks, Rotation, Chicago, and One Pocket. And for fun my favorite is 8 ball.

As regards lighting, whichever type you use: incandescent, fluorescent, or halogen, the important thing is that ideally, all areas of the table should be illuminated to 120 lux this can easily be checked using a light meter with a 'spot' attachment. The area beyond the table should be illuminated to no more than 50 lux. As you pointed out, the light does not necessarily need to be hung low over the table.

I prefer daylight balanced fluorescents for good reason.
Daylight balanced fluorescents reproduce the entire spectrum of light as natural sunlight, thus the effect is more natural with colors and shapes being better defined. Although 'daylight balanced' bulbs cost more, the benefits of better lighting, and reduced eyestrain, are well worth the price difference.

Fats

SecaucusFats
06-22-2003, 08:56 AM
The correct lux setting for the table bed and rails should be 520 lux, not 120 lux as I wrote in my previous post. Sorry.

BTW- A diffuser like the one used on the Diamond light fixtures is a very nice thing to have as it also helps improve the overall even quality of the light and makes for less strain on the eyes. If you are using a 3 bulb incandescent set up, use a lower wattage bulb in the middle, to prevent an excessively bright 'hot spot' in the center of the table. Say your lamp calls for 150 watt bulbs, use 150-100-150 rather than 150 watt bulbs all around.

Fats