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View Full Version : Cue case interiors for custom cases?



Irish
06-19-2003, 12:56 PM
Anyone know where to get the interior plastic moldings that hold cues in cases? Or does anyone know a good material that is used to cast your own?. I know Instroke use PVC tubing but they have a hard plastic oval tube that goes around all of the pvc tubes as well. Anyone know how to find those large plastic oval tubes?

Is there some kind of cue case parts supply place that would have this kind of stuff. If not who is it that people like Porper, Instroke, Whitten, ect... are talking to to get that internal structure of their cases built.

Thanks for any help I can get.

Pizza Bob
06-19-2003, 01:25 PM
You're talking apples and oranges. If you want a Fellini/Centennial/It's George type 1x2 case (and I think that is what you are referencing with the "large oval tube" comment - I can't tell you the name of the company, but I do know that they will charge you a set-up fee, just as if this is the first time they are manufacturing this shape. This protects those companies already making these cases (and I think it's down to one now - Thomas), who paid the fee. A Justis case uses regular round PVC tubing, covered and the outer material of the case is leather. Porper's interiors, are, I think, injection molded with some sort of expanding foam. Your best bet for a "make your own" would probably be the Justis formula - at least the components are obtainable. Good luck.

Adios,

Pizza Bob

Irish
06-19-2003, 03:12 PM
Nah, I dont want a Fellini type case. I am building a 3x4. If you look at Instroke though you will see that while they use PVC tubing as the slots they also have a solid oval tube that surrounds all the interior tubes and therefore makes the case solid. I know Justis does not use the outer large tube but I find that is a weakness in his cases as you can squeeze the case out of shape quite easily. Whitten looks like he uses a injected mold from what I can tell from his site (although none of the pictures are close enough for me to be sure).

I think I might have one idea, not sure if it will work or how easy the material is to come by.

heater451
06-19-2003, 04:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Irish:</font><hr> . . .I am building a 3x4. If you look at Instroke though you will see that while they use PVC tubing as the slots they also have a solid oval tube that surrounds all the interior tubes and therefore makes the case solid. I know Justis does not use the outer large tube but I find that is a weakness in his cases as you can squeeze the case out of shape quite easily. Whitten looks like he uses a injected mold from what I can tell from his site (although none of the pictures are close enough for me to be sure).

I think I might have one idea, not sure if it will work or how easy the material is to come by. <hr /></blockquote>Some place like here (http://www.genplex.com/profiles.html) might make the stuff you need, but I agree with PizzaBob, that there's probably going to be a sizable set up cost.

Alternatively, here something else to think about:

I used to have a friend in the SCA, who made 'armor' pieces formed some plastic from sheeting. I believe that it was ABS plastic, but there's a lot of types out there. He was using sheets that were 1/8-1/4" thick, which is hard to shape into complex curves, but simple, rolling bends around (roughly) a single axis wouldn't be hard.

At least one caveat, length. My friend would place the piece to form into an oven, wait for it to become pliable, and then take it out quickly (while wearing thick gloves), and form it on a wooden "buck". Finding an oven that would accomodate a piece long enough for a case might be difficult.

Getting the edges aligned correctly before the plastic cools might be hard as well. And, depending on the thickness of sheeting used, you would have to come up with a good way to seal the seam--if you needed it as one piece. Short of using a plastic welder, you might have to overlap and glue it, or you might be able to align it closely, fill the gap w/ epoxy, and then use large hose clamps or belts to clamp it together.

If you are putting it inside a leather sleeve, then having sealed at the seam may not matter. The leather will hold it together, and the plastic should be tough enough to ward off a reasonable amount of crushing force.

Just some ideas. . . .



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Irish
06-19-2003, 04:48 PM
Heater that is something I was just thinking about. I broke my hand not too long ago and the second cast/splint they made me at the hospital was made out of a plastic that when heated was quite easy to mold and shape. When the plastic cooled off it became very strong and kept its shape very well. They used hot water to heat the plastic at the hospital and a towel soaked in hot water and then placed on the plastic might be enough to make the plastic pliable enough to work with. A small torch could be used to hit key areas where the plastic might have cooled too much during the shaping process. If I can find a place that sells that plastic stuff and find it is not too expensive that is something I am very likely going to try. I was also thinking about fiberglass as they used on the first cast as it also is extremely strong and keeps its shape very well.

Thanks alot for the ideas =)

tateuts
06-19-2003, 04:54 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Irish:</font><hr> I know Justis does not use the outer large tube but I find that is a weakness in his cases as you can squeeze the case out of shape quite easily. Whitten looks like he uses a injected mold from what I can tell from his site (although none of the pictures are close enough for me to be sure).

<hr /></blockquote>

I have all of these cases. The Justis case doesn't need anything between the tubes because the outer leather is so thick. He does it this way because the interiors are replaceable (Jack will put in new interior tubes and probably sells them too). While the Whitten case is stronger, the leather is glued directly to the foam so the bad thing is if the case gets dinged, it causes a dent in the foam which is therefore visible in the leather.

Foam core cases are difficult because they're usually molded to fit a generic stick, and if the holes are too tight, or have a different taper, they can get stuck. Whittens holes are large, so the shafts disappear. Porpers are tight, so the top is hard to close and the shafts can get stuck when pushed down. The advantage to foam core is that the finished case is pretty light and very strong.

I believe most of the case makers outsource the foam core injection to companies suited for this, then sew up and assemble the cases in their own plants.

Chris

heater451
06-19-2003, 04:58 PM
That's another issue that I forgot to put in the last post, cost.

The 4x8' sheets that my friend bought was about $80! (ouch)

The hot water stuff sounds interesting, but I wonder how hot it has to get (like boiling a mouthpiece hot?). Got to be $$$ too, I bet.

Oh, and I think a heat gun might work as well, since a torch concentrates a lot of heat--then again, I think they make 'flame spreaders' for propane torches, for paint removal.

If you decide on something, successful or not, please post your results. Pics would be cool too.



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Irish
06-19-2003, 05:07 PM
[ QUOTE ]
If you decide on something, successful or not, please post your results. Pics would be cool too. <hr /></blockquote>

Will do Heater. If all goes really well (which I hope) maybe Justis and Whitten will have abit more competition in the custom case market =)