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The Rhino Chaser
06-23-2003, 12:18 PM
I was just wandering if anybody knows the difference between a professional and amateur pool player? Persoanlly, I don't think there is a difference. Pool is the only sport I know of, where an amateur can win money in a tournament have the result and pay out listed in a national magazine and not lose their amateur status.

George Comerford
06-23-2003, 12:26 PM
The difference between a Pro and an amatuer,I questioned this a few years ago when I entered the US Amatuer`s and here in a nutshell is how it was described to me by the APA.

A pro is classified as a person who derives the majority of their income from pool(playing,teaching).This has to be proven.Other than that your considered an amatuer.I know it`s a pretty thin description but thats it.

George

pooltchr
06-23-2003, 02:14 PM
I questioned the APA and was told the same thing. If half of your income comes from pool, you are considered a pro by their standards.

9 Ball Girl
06-23-2003, 02:17 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> If half of your income comes from pool, you are considered a pro by their standards. <hr /></blockquote>Hmmm. But would that be the hard earned way or the "chancey" kind of way? /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

JPB
06-23-2003, 03:21 PM
Golf has real rules about amateur status and an organizing body that can enforce it. Pool doesn't. It's hit and miss. Live w/ it. I agree there are no really amateur pool players since most of us have played in a tournament with cash prizes. The difference is really if we are any good or not. I stink, but if pool had the same rules as golf I would be considered a pro, or at least somebody who lost amateur status. The test of having a substantial chunk of you income coming from play isn't bad, but someday there will be someone who doesn't play pool for much of his money since pool pays so little, but will be by all accounts a pro. The distinction between pro and amateur is breaking down in other sports now, the trend is away from any distinction.

George Comerford
06-23-2003, 04:42 PM
I think they`re lucky gambling can`t be documented /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Technically it would come down to a tax return.........I wonder how many pro`s actually file their income tax as a "Professional Pool Player" /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif
This could possibly mean that there are only 20 or 30 Pro`s in the world,everyone else is a amatuer so I`m in good company.

George

Patrick
06-24-2003, 05:06 PM
The best amateur is always better than the best pro.

Patrick

shoot2thrill
06-24-2003, 06:38 PM
I asked a pro about this and he told me that if an amature pays a 300.00 entry fee and finishes in the money he is no longer a amature he is classified as a pro player.also most pro players have other jobs pool is just there hobbies .unless your a big name player. big jim.w

The Watchdog
06-25-2003, 11:41 AM
As faras the government is concerned, professional pool player would signify a majority of income is derived from pool.

Many tournaments use various power indexes, usually the top 64 for men, to draw the line separating pro from amateur.

Jimmy Mendoza
06-25-2003, 11:59 AM
There is no formal distinction between amateur and professional pool players that I know of. Some organizations (such as the BCA) have their own criteria by which they make the distinction, but there is no "industry wide standard" which separates the two.

arn3
06-25-2003, 09:26 PM
there's no standard or structure in pool(this is one of its problems). as a result, i think it's more a matter of perception. as in, how do people percieve you, pro or amateur.
and how can any pool org. determine if one is deriving most of his income from pool? it's all very vague.

Rod
06-25-2003, 09:51 PM
Right, there is not any structure. I remember reading once for eligibility to the BCA Nationals. If you were going to compete you could not have won over $300 in a pro event. Who's checking? I don't know if that still exists but it has been violated.

Rod