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View Full Version : Table Size and Practice



Bassn7
07-08-2003, 09:03 AM
I know this is going to be a "big can of worms".

I am of the opinion that if you are going to spend 'TONS' of hours practicing and learning . . . it should be on the table size you will play your matches as well as the kind of game you want to play. Example: 1)Practicing on a 9 footer . . . Pro nine ball or one pocket players. 2)Bar box . . . league 8 and or 9 ball players. 3) 8 foot table . . . shouldn't even be in production since NO league or Pro matches take place on them.

I see numerous players practice on the 9 or 8 foot tables and then ONLY play league matches on the bar box. The tables do not "play" the same. Shots and strategy are totally different on different tables. I've spent my entire adult life with a single focus: bar table 8-ball. So I bought a 7 foot bar box for the house. Does this make sense?

Tom_In_Cincy
07-08-2003, 09:09 AM
If you are practicing "just playing the game" I agree.

BUT,

ANY table will allow you to practice your 'stroke'.

Your 'stroke' is the one common aspect you'll need for all table sizes.

Scott Lee
07-08-2003, 09:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bassn7:</font><hr> I know this is going to be a "big can of worms".

I am of the opinion that if you are going to spend 'TONS' of hours practicing and learning . . . it should be on the table size you will play your matches as well as the kind of game you want to play. Example: 1)Practicing on a 9 footer . . . Pro nine ball or one pocket players. 2)Bar box . . . league 8 and or 9 ball players. 3) 8 foot table . . . shouldn't even be in production since NO league or Pro matches take place on them.

I see numerous players practice on the 9 or 8 foot tables and then ONLY play league matches on the bar box. The tables do not "play" the same. Shots and strategy are totally different on different tables. I've spent my entire adult life with a single focus: bar table 8-ball. So I bought a 7 foot bar box for the house. Does this make sense? <hr /></blockquote>

First of all...it makes NO difference what size table you practice on. If you have a STROKE, you should be able to quickly adjust to ANY size table. Second, there are all kinds of league and tournament matches played on 8' tables...apparently just none in your area. I agree that the majority of pro matches are played on 9', and the majority of amateur/semi-pro events are played on 7' tables.
However, my opinion is that the tables DO play MOSTLY the same regardless of size. A pool table is twice as long, as it is wide...that is the only consideration. Angles are the same, there may be some slight differences in banking, but that is due more to inconsistency in rails, than table size. Again, a poolplayer must learn to adjust quickly to ANY playing conditions, and be able to do it before his/her opponent. The kind of things I teach, allow a player to jump from 7 to 9 or vice versa (or 8) with no trouble at all. So...there you have my two cents!

Scott Lee

Bassn7
07-08-2003, 11:32 AM
So that I understand your position Mr Lee . . . if I know that ALL my matches and tournaments are going to be played on 7 foot bar tables, spending time on a 9 footer practicing 8-ball is "equally" as efficient at preparing for my matches as shooting on the 7 footer.

Response: Two players practice 8-ball for 5 years. One on the 9 foot table the other on the 7 footer. They play a match on the 7 foot table. Who would probably have an advantage? It wouldn't be the guy who practiced in the "big arena". Why, because the strategy and the closeness (clutter) of the balls define that the games are completely DIFFERENT.

Fred Agnir
07-08-2003, 11:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bassn7:</font><hr> 3) 8 foot table . . . shouldn't even be in production since NO league or Pro matches take place on them.
<hr /></blockquote>A good percentage of the bar tables in my area are 8' bar tables.

Fred

Bassn7
07-08-2003, 12:17 PM
True, there are alot of 8 foot tables out there but no "sanctioned" league championships are played on them. ie. APA, BCA etc.

Fred Agnir
07-08-2003, 12:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bassn7:</font><hr> True, there are alot of 8 foot tables out there but no "sanctioned" league championships are played on them. ie. APA, BCA etc. <hr /></blockquote>I wonder why you say this? After I tell you that I play in a BCA-sanctioned tournament in a pool hall where we only use the 8' tables, are you going to reclarify your position again?

Fred

DoomCue
07-08-2003, 12:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bassn7:</font><hr> True, there are alot of 8 foot tables out there but no "sanctioned" league championships are played on them. ie. APA, BCA etc. <hr /></blockquote>I wonder why you say this? After I tell you that I play in a BCA-sanctioned tournament in a pool hall where we only use the 8' tables, are you going to reclarify your position again?

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

I wonder if Bassn7 means that there are no National championships played on 8 footers. Course, I don't know if that's true either.... Just hate to see a guy backpedal so fast is all /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif .

Tom_In_Cincy
07-08-2003, 01:13 PM
Bassn7,
Your question has merit. But, too many assumptions have to be made to make the blanket statement that the person that practiced on a 7 foot for 5 years would win. Are both players playing only 8 ball? Are both equal skill levels? Do both players have a good consistant stroke?

Just because the 9 foot table won't produce as many clusters doesn't mean that there aren't any clusters. Table management (cluster, clutter breakouts) can be learned on both size tables.

7 foot table are a challenge to any player, they are not easier because of their size. They are just the choice of a lot of Bar owners because of their size. They just don't take up as much room as a 9 foot table.

I practice on 9 footers because that is what I prefer. I can play on 7 footers with as much confidence, maybe more. The majority of 7 footers I've played on have very wide pockets compared to the 4 inch pockets on the 9 footers I play on.

If the two were of the same skill level, I would say its a toss up. Table rolls would be a big factor.

My experiences have seen that the 9 foot table player can be just as good on the bar boxes than the equally skilled bar box players. But the opposite is normally not true in this area.

If I were playing exclusively on bar boxes I would practice on barboxes. But, I have a choice, and in the pool rooms here in the Cincy area, there are always a choice of 7, 8 or 9 foot tables.

The 'players' in this area play and practice on the 9 footers.

Wally_in_Cincy
07-08-2003, 01:23 PM
I think you're cheating yourself if you only play on one size table. I agree, in your situation, it makes sense to play mostly on the 7-foot. But, one advantage of playing on larger tables is that when you go back to the 7-foot there is no such thing as a "long shot". They almost all look like bunny shots. JMO.

Wally~~plays on 7, 8, and 9

griffith_d
07-08-2003, 01:33 PM
For me, if I practice on an larger table than I play on, the shots are easier. Going from an 8 to a 6 makes longs shot very short.

Since I have bad sight and play without glasses, the shorter table is easier for me on long shots.

But that's just me,...

Griff

Bassn7
07-08-2003, 02:36 PM
To all: Yes I am talking about the BCA and APA National Championships being played on 7 foot tables. Locally, all the pool halls here in my area have 7 foot tables available specifically to prepare their players/teams for these events. Believe me I know my limitations. I struggle on the big tables. I have no intentions to expend any effort on them since my focus and goals involve bar table matches. I've simply chosen to apply my time in one arena. Just a "life's choice" I've made. Very single minded but to me very fullfilling.

Tom_In_Cincy
07-08-2003, 02:43 PM
Bassn7
It makes all the sense you need for your decision.
I just wonder why you asked if it makes sense to the rest of CCB?
I agree with your choice and decision.
And, I have also commented on other choices and I hope they make sense too.

If I played on nothing but bar boxes.. that would be my table of choice at home.. but I think I would have to have a Diamond Smart table LOL.

07-08-2003, 03:17 PM
Speaking for myself, playing "down" is easier than playing "up" with regards to table size. It is far easier to adjust to the smaller table, even when the opportunity for clutter is increased, than to adjust to the larger table.

One area where bar boxes ARE usually more difficult when you're not used to them, is with the oversize or overweight cueball, in which case it makes sense to buy such a cueball to practice with at home or the PH.

I grew up learning to play on 8' tables. When I left home and started playing on the bar scene, I found 6' and 7' bar boxes much easier, and played nothing but those for years. When the opportunity came for me to start playing on larger tables, my game struggled for a long time adjusting to the longer shots and proportionally smaller pockets. Yeah, there was a bit less clutter, but those long shots and smaller pockets were a bear!

Currently, I play mostly on 8' tables again, as that's what I have at home and I don't go out much anymore. When I do go out, I generally find 7' tables easier, and 9' tables quite a bit more challenging. I think one advantaging to practicing mostly on the "median" 8' tables is that it takes only minor adjustments to go up or down, whereas going from one extreme to the other is much more challenging.

However I do agree that if you play almost exclusively on one table size over another, that you should mostly practice on that size. But for players who play on the whole spectrum of table sizes and must choose a size to devote most of their practice to, I'd say the time put in on the larger table pays greater dividends across the board.

Just my $0.02, of course... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

griffith_d
07-08-2003, 06:47 PM
The type of cloth being the same as for both practice and on tournaments/leagues is a bigger factor for me. When I practice at home(oversize 8 as it is called) and then play at Slick Willies(standard 8), the cloth is slower at SW's than at home and I have to hit harder to get the same distance. I usually come up short for awhile or miss the shot until I adjust.

Then when I go home and practice I have to shoot softer again. It is a little frustrating but not too bad. Simonis would be out of the question for at home as the difference would be too great and take too long to adjust every Tuesday.

Griff

dmgwalsh
07-09-2003, 04:27 AM
At home I have a pro 8, brunswick vip, 8'8". I went to a pool hall the other day and practiced on a Brunswick 9 footer. None of my long shots would go in for quite a while. The pockets were much smaller. Two balls would barely fit in the pocket. Eventually, I started making some, but not all of my longer shots. When I got home, I put two balls side by side in the pockets and noticed 1/4 to 1/2" more room. I noticed that a lot of my shots at home were making their way into the holes thanks to the generous pockets. What a sobering event.
Now I'm gonna try to concentrate on getting the balls in the middle of the pocket, so that when I go to a larger table the adjustment is not so drastic.