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dooziexx
07-09-2003, 08:20 AM
I used a damp towel to clean the wrap area on my cue and when it dried, the wrap did not return to the original smooth finish. Instead its rough. What should I have done?

Barbara
07-09-2003, 10:33 AM
Definitely not what you just did!

How damp was the towel? Is this wrap new? I use a slightly damp towel, but I go with the wrap instead of against the wrap, then I do the same with a dry towel to remove the dampness. It comes out shiny. Plus, my wrap's 6 1/2 years old and it has absorbed a lot of hand oil by now, so it won't fuzz up.

What you're going to have to do next is get thee to a cue repair shop and have them re-press the linen.

Barbara~~~ruined a Cortland linen wrap that way one time..

tateuts
07-09-2003, 10:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dooziexx:</font><hr> I used a damp towel to clean the wrap area on my cue and when it dried, the wrap did not return to the original smooth finish. Instead its rough. What should I have done? <hr /></blockquote>

When you clean a wrap with Windex, 409, or water, it will dry it out and rough up - just like what happened to you. After it's rough, you can smooth it by lightly sanding it with 600 grit paper (dry). You can go over it with 1000 grit if the 600 is not smooth enough. If the wrap still feels dry in your hands, you can take a light amount of baby oil and rub it onto your hands, then rub your hands over the wrap until it feels good. Do not sand too much - just enough to get it smooth. Linen is tougher than you think! It can also be polished afterward, but that's best accomplished with a lathe.

These are my own techniques - they have worked well for me.

Chris

griffith_d
07-09-2003, 10:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dooziexx:</font><hr> What should I have done? <hr /></blockquote>

I am not being sarcastic, but have you thought of your cue having no wrap?

Griff

bolo
07-09-2003, 07:10 PM
A lot of cuemakers use butchers wax on the wraps. It is easier to do on a lathe but you can do it yourself. Apply the wax and use something like the side of a glass to rub down the wrap. Let it dry then buff it lightly with a paper towel. It should be like it was before. I like to buff a little butchers wax into my wrap once and a while anyway. It gives a little tacky feel to it that I like.

pooltchr
07-14-2003, 07:30 AM
I use liquid spray starch on the linen wraps. Spray it directly on a clean cloth until damp, then work it around the wrap. (I do it on a lathe, but you could do it by hand as well) The starch pulls out the dirt and helps restore that smooth shiny finish to the wrap.

DLB
07-15-2003, 12:45 PM
I agree that the best way is to have the wrap professionally cleaned and pressed but if you can't get that done try wax paper you buy at the grocery store. Rub it with the grain of the wrap. Works pretty well and won't hurt the linen.

SpiderMan
07-15-2003, 12:50 PM
Where do you purchase "butcher's wax", and how is it packaged/recognized?

SpiderMan

SPetty
07-15-2003, 01:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Where do you purchase "butcher's wax", and how is it packaged/recognized?<hr /></blockquote>Turns out it's a brand name...
Butcher's Wax (http://butcherwax.home.comcast.net/wsb/html/view.cgi-home.html-.html)

Rod
07-15-2003, 01:24 PM
I use denatured alcohol sparingly. Turn the cue in the direction of the wrap. It takes away hand oils, chalk etc. and leaves it slick. It dries fast and never had a problem with it lifting the fibres. Water soaks into the wrap and dries slow. Due to it's nature it want's to expand the fibres. Either way, go with the wrap and just a dry damp cloth.

Rod

Sid_Vicious
07-15-2003, 01:42 PM
I had a player sitting next to me one evening, watching a local 9-ball tournament, and the question about linen wrap cleaning came up. He was automatic with this, "Use silicon spray." I had forgotten about it until reading your post, I have no-wrap and leather on all of my general play cues, so I've not soiled any linen in quite a while. I'd be bound to try it though when the time comes. I have also heard of using wax paper, so the butcher's wax might be usable as well. Still, he was antimate about the silicon...sid

bolo
07-15-2003, 02:19 PM
It is a hard paste wax the name Butchers is the name brand there are a number of waxes you could use. On a lathe you apply the wax and press it into the wrap then buff it off. I use two pieces of 1/2 x 2 x 8 inches blocks of delrin to press it kind of close pin like set up. This is not a goofy idea this is how some of the best know cuemakers do. It is amazing how many guys here like to work on their own cues.

tateuts
07-15-2003, 02:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bolo:</font><hr> It is a hard paste wax the name Butchers is the name brand there are a number of waxes you could use. On a lathe you apply the wax and press it into the wrap then buff it off. I use two pieces of 1/2 x 2 x 8 inches blocks of delrin to press it kind of close pin like set up. This is not a goofy idea this is how some of the best know cuemakers do. It is amazing how many guys here like to work on their own cues. <hr /></blockquote>

This is a "press" and leaves the wrap with a polished shine, right? Me, I like a soft, cloth-like feel, which is what it feels like after that polish is worked off.

Chris

bolo
07-15-2003, 07:54 PM
To each his own. If you had a display at a trade show with fuzzy wraps though, you may get some funny looks. If you read the original question, he was asking how to get the wrap smooth again after cleaning it.

Fran Crimi
07-15-2003, 08:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dooziexx:</font><hr> I used a damp towel to clean the wrap area on my cue and when it dried, the wrap did not return to the original smooth finish. Instead its rough. What should I have done? <hr /></blockquote>

According to cuemaker Pete Tascarella, you were half-way there. He recommends a damp (not wet) towel with no soap or cleaning fluid. When the wrap dries, take a plain brown paper bag (if they still exist) and burnish the wrap. The natural oils from the bag will penetrate the wrap and bring it back to it's original lustre without leaving a film or residue on it.

Some of the other methods written here sound pretty good as well.

Fran