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View Full Version : Being So Particular, Really Needed?



Sid_Vicious
07-18-2003, 10:45 AM
I got to thinking just now that many pool players are extremely sensitive about having the exact equipment when they play, and yet the prominent gamblers and wandering road players(along with the rest of the non particular locals), can grab a wall cue, and their performance is the same or darn close to the same as with their main cue/tip combo. Now we can summize that maybe there's still an edge being lost by those who grab anything and play, still their stature in the pool scene seems(IMO) to rank the same no matter what they play with. Do you ever wonder if we(AND I HAVE BEEN CERTAINLY GUILTY!) have allowed ourselves to have been over trained in getting "just the right sound and feel" from our cues? Just seems like we may have become worry-worts over mostly non important details,,,maybe I'm wrong...sid

UTAddb
07-18-2003, 10:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> Do you ever wonder if we(AND I HAVE BEEN CERTAINLY GUILTY!) have allowed ourselves to have been over trained in getting "just the right sound and feel" from our cues? <hr /></blockquote>
Yes!

UWPoolGod
07-18-2003, 10:56 AM
I can usually pick up a house cue and feel pretty good about how I am playing with it. However when I was playing last night, I could not stand shooting with one and wished I had brought mine from home. For me, I have to be more careful with the english and shoot with an open bridge. My pudgy short fat fingers prefer the longers pro tapered shaft as opposed to conical house cues. Then this makes me miss certain stroke shots.

Todd &lt;-- wishes all bars carried Custom wall sticks LOLOLOL

Fred Agnir
07-18-2003, 11:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I got to thinking just now that many pool players are extremely sensitive about having the exact equipment when they play, and yet the prominent gamblers and wandering road players(along with the rest of the non particular locals), can grab a wall cue, and their performance is the same or darn close to the same as with their main cue/tip combo. Now we can summize that maybe there's still an edge being lost by those who grab anything and play, still their stature in the pool scene seems(IMO) to rank the same no matter what they play with. Do you ever wonder if we(AND I HAVE BEEN CERTAINLY GUILTY!) have allowed ourselves to have been over trained in getting "just the right sound and feel" from our cues? Just seems like we may have become worry-worts over mostly non important details,,,maybe I'm wrong...sid <hr /></blockquote>I think you're making faulty conclusion from faulty observations. It's evident in every sport out there that the individual player has individual needs for their equipment, even if one piece of equipment in of itself may not have any inherent advantages over another. That holds true from baseball to bowling. Darts to handguns.

I think you're confusing professional players whose B game is still far and beyond sub-echelon players. So, to say that their game remains the same may not be a fair assessment. Maybe their game with a house stick still shines beyond, say, my skill. But their house stick game more than likely pales compared to their game with a better crafted cue. Ask any pro player if he wants to match up with another pro player with a house stick or their own stick, and you'll get the answer. I've read pros say that they'd quit the game if they lost their particular cue.

Maybe you should discuss it with Spiderman and let him give you his opinion. After all, he's giving up an expensive custom stick simply because he can't shoot with it as well as his trusted ol' faithful. Right? Must be a difference he can truly feel.


Fred

cycopath
07-18-2003, 11:46 AM
I feel like the gambler or raod player is not going to play someone that's up to their own skill level in pool. So they don't need the extra edge a qualtiy cue can give. But a pro-level player knows that he's going to be competeing against worthy opponents, so he can't leave anything to chance, like a warped shaft or crappy tip, etc.
JMO.

NBC-BOB
07-18-2003, 11:52 AM
I think Fred's comments are right on track.I don't like playing with a house cue and know I don't play as well as I do with my own cue.Even if a pro playing with a house cue drops his level down a little there so much better to start with that you'd hardly notice the difference.

heater451
07-18-2003, 08:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> . . .Maybe you should discuss it with Spiderman and let him give you his opinion. After all, he's giving up an expensive custom stick simply because he can't shoot with it as well as his trusted ol' faithful. Right? Must be a difference he can truly feel.


Fred <hr /></blockquote>That's even beyond "apples and oranges". . . .Spidey's custom job was longer (2", IIRC), which really is quite a difference.

I bought a cheap cue the other day (kinda by accident--it was an eBay thing), and when I got it, I noticed that it's 1" shorter than my regular cue. I notice the difference, because I wind up gripping the end of the butt when I break, and I can tell where the tip addressed the ball is farther away (although, I realize this can be dependent on the grip location). It's not so bad as to be unusable, but different enough that I dumped it to being a break cue--and I don't always use it then, either. . . .

Personally, I believe more in the player, than the equipment, but I can easily understand how, when one becomes very accustomed to how a cue 'is' (not just the hit, but how it feels all around), then it can be hard to adjust. For example, my Viking needed a cleaning badly, and I found that I had gotten used to how much drag (friction) it had on my bridge hand. After I cleaned and sanded it (1500, wet--there was no getting around using sandpaper), it was so smooth, that I had problems shooting with it! Oddly enough, however, I believe that I would have had less problems, with a different cue , even if it was as smooth.

I think that the "mental" component is a strong factor as well.



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stevelomako
07-18-2003, 08:39 PM
Pat Fleming (Acustats) used to be a top player and ran around using a house cue in big tournaments or whatever. He played jam-up with it. Wonder if he still has it?

Steve