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bluewolf
07-20-2003, 03:52 AM
What David (Blackjack) said about Earl got me thinking about this in a round about way. When ww and I got married, he was on a team of engineers, sl4s, and a couple of sl3s and one sl5. Now, at this time I was not even playing yet but he talked to me about his frustration in trying to teach these guys strategy or how to read the table, know when to go for it, when to play safe, how to know the correct order of balls to sink.

He was wondering if it was a right brain/left brain thing.And some of his fellow 7s think this is something you have or havent and it cannot be taught.

Now I have noticed two things.Two players,both initially looked/look to not have much talent. One of these sl3s hung on everyword WW said. He learned how to read the table, has advanced and keeps getting better. Of course, he also puts in table time.

There is a woman I beat early on who is a low sl. I saw her play a week ago and something was different. She was still a very weak shooter but, she was trying to read the table. She was trying after the break, to pick the set of balls that would be to her advantage. She was trying to figure out the correct order to shoot the balls in. She looked from one ball to the next one she needed to get on. She does not have the shape skills, but she is thinking. I thought this was pretty neat.

Then when David mentioned drive,determination, in talking about Earl, it was like a light bulb came on. Perhaps this ability was not some elusive thing like different brains. Other than time and experience, perhaps like the original sl3 who just keeps playing stronger each session, it is determination along with time on the table, with some experience in competition thrown in.

I now wonder if those who say you have either have got this ability or not are wrong.That it isnt about different brains either. It is pure and simple. Those sl4 engineers are quite comfortable where they are. The sl3 had drive and that it is not something woowoo but determination and willingness to work harder to become better.

WW started teaching me this stuff early on and I am okay in that area for the time I have played, while others who played longer are not.

Are these players who are weak at reading the table weak in part because they have not been taught, do not have drive or is there a grain of truth in what those sl7s say that some have it and some do not?

Not something I think about too often,but David kind of added a new possibility, one which should have been obvious, drive, determination, with a little guts thrown in.

Thought this might be an interesting topic.

Laura

Wally_in_Cincy
07-20-2003, 07:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr>
....Are these players who are weak at reading the table weak in part because they have not been taught, do not have drive or is there a grain of truth in what those sl7s say that some have it and some do not?.....<hr /></blockquote>

It does not have to be an inherent, instinctive ability. It can be taught. It can be learned. I am living proof of this.

pooltchr
07-21-2003, 06:28 AM
One of my best students was nothing more than a ball banger 2 years ago. He puts in the table time, does quality time with drills, asks questions, and watches and listens. He has progressed from sl3 to sl6 in the last year. He was by no means a "natural". His desire to learn, and willingness to do whatever it takes is what is bringing him success.

Fred Agnir
07-21-2003, 07:05 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr> Those sl4 engineers are quite comfortable where they are. <hr /></blockquote>Every time you say something like this, you are perpetuating an odd myth based on a very incorrect presumption.

I'm an engineer by schooling. I also write poetry. My brother-in-law is probably a better engineer than I am. He is also an excellent natural musician. My sister was better at math and sciences then I'll ever be. She has her Masters in Theater Arts and was on Broadway (Miss Saigon - original USA cast) for over 8 years. Both my parents are MENSA members. And they are two of the best musicians I know. My father is a natural. My mother is on the American Guild of Organists, a piano and voice teacher, started a community theater group, and is a published poet.

This left brain right brain stuff may have some wonderful value, but when you're a pool player, it's both analytical and creative. There are a multitude of people in this world that excel in both halves.

Fred

bluewolf
07-21-2003, 09:18 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr> Those sl4 engineers are quite comfortable where they are. <hr /></blockquote>Every time you say something like this, you are perpetuating an odd myth based on a very incorrect presumption.

Fred
<hr /></blockquote>

I could have just as well said those sl4 artists, truckdrivers or anything, and should have specified that it is those particular players. After going round and round with ww and another advanced player on all of the right brain/left brain, natural ability for strategy and all of that, it occured that it might be drive, open mindedness and determination. What David said about Earl kind of got my wheels going. The guy who started as an sl3 a year or so ago, who is a physicist,listened and had drive and keeps advancing.

WW and one of his buds thought and were looking for reasons and asked me questions. It just occurred that they might be looking in the wrong place when it is much more simple than the possibilities they were looking at and asking me about.When david said what he did about earl, all of the right brain left brain and other woowoo possibilities fell by the way side for me.

But curious about what others may think,thought it was a good topic of discussion, so I threw it out.Nothing more, nothing less

Laura