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rina
07-30-2003, 05:33 AM
Although religion is no longer dominates everyday life in Western society, Islam becomes the fastest-growing religion in America and in the world?
Have we been invaded?

A NATION CHALLENGED: AMERICAN MUSLIMS; Islam Attracts Converts By the Thousand, Drawn Before and After Attacks
By JODI WILGOREN
Source: The New York Times: October 22, 2001, Monday
Section: National Desk

http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/3016/fastest.htm

"Islam is the fastest-growing religion in America, a guide and pillar of stability for many of our people..." Hillary Rodman Clinton, Los Angeles Times, May 31, 1996, p.3

http://www.whyislam.org/discoverwhy.htm
http://www.islam-guide.com

################################################

Famous people are affected too.

"Yusuf Islam" Former Jazz Singer "Cat Stevens" Came to Islam
Hear his story as told him . . . read more
http://www.islamtomorrow.net/converts/yusuf_islam.htm

eg8r
07-30-2003, 06:08 AM
Your very first post is about Islam?

eg8r

UWPoolGod
07-30-2003, 08:49 AM
I was thinking the same thing. Just nuke Liberia and the West Bank...will solve all sorts of problems and only cost a few million per nuke.

bolo
07-30-2003, 09:39 AM
Most of these people are fadists (sp). Next month they will be worshiping oak trees. I have respect for people I believe are sincere, the rest are for the most part idiots.

Blackwolf
07-30-2003, 04:47 PM
Do you feel it is impossible to be sincere about something without making a long term committment to it?

Blackwolf
07-30-2003, 05:10 PM
In recent years, the United States has been incarcerating a tremendous number of people and jail has always been a place that inspires many to find religion.

Most of the inmates are of the African-American race. One out of every eight AA men aged 20 to 34 are currently incarcerated and it is estimated that more than one in four AA's will do jailtime during their life.(1) Islam is popular with AAs. That is one of the causes of the increase in Islam in the USA.

Sometimes I go to the Moslem meetings where I live. It gives me something to do and I make friends in the black community that way also.

BW

(1) The Age (http://www.theage.com.au/text/articles/2003/04/07/1049567619498.htm)

rackmup
07-30-2003, 06:32 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Blackwolf:</font><hr> ...Moslem meetings... <hr /></blockquote>

What is a "Moslem?"

Just curious because if the serve good 'Q and cold beer, I might want to go too.

Regards,

Ken

Rod
07-30-2003, 06:41 PM
Who cares? Give me a reason why I should. Religion is a poor subject for internet forums. Believe as you will and so will I.

rackmup
07-30-2003, 06:43 PM
Blackwolf,

Commitment and sincerity go hand-in-hand doofus. Don't believe me? Check it out.

commitment
com·mit·ment

3. The state of being bound emotionally or intellectually to a course of action or to another person or persons: a deep commitment to liberal policies; a profound commitment to the family.

sincere
sin·cere


2. Being without hypocrisy or pretense; true

doofus
doo·fus

Slang An incompetent, foolish, or stupid person: Blackwolf is a doofus.

Regards,

Ken

ken
kn
1. Perception; understanding: "complex issues well beyond our ken."
2a. Range of vision. b. View; sight.
VERB: Inflected forms: kenned or kent (AUDIO: knt), ken·ning, kens
Scots
TRANSITIVE VERB: 1. To know (a person or thing).
2. To recognize.
INTRANSITIVE VERB: To have knowledge or an understanding.
ETYMOLOGY: From Middle English kennen (influenced by Old Norse kenna, to know), from Old English cennan, to declare. See gn- in Appendix I.)

p.s.

Most complex issues are well beyond me.

Blackwolf
07-30-2003, 07:01 PM
Can't one be committed to something for a few years, a few months or an even lesser time period in some cases?

If one makes a less than lifetime committment to something, does that define the person as a doofus or as a former poster said, an idiot?

Do you believe people should not be allowed to change their minds, to grow, and to learn new things?

How long a period of time is long enough?

Can you discuss anything on it's merits without resorting to ad hominem remarks?

BW

rackmup
07-30-2003, 07:04 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Blackwolf:</font><hr> Can you discuss the anything on it's merits without resorting to ad hominem statements? <hr /></blockquote>

Nope.

And, I don't even like Hominem's music. I think it's terrible the things he says about his mom in his songs. OPC does however like the song, "Superman."

Regards,

Ken (we're talking about "sincerity" and "commitment" and Blackwolf wants to talk about a Rap musician. Hmmpphh /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif)

kingarthur
07-30-2003, 08:41 PM
hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha hahahahah!

HAHAHAHAHAHA!

Arthur
King of Camelot

eg8r
07-31-2003, 07:39 AM
[ QUOTE ]
the United States has been incarcerating a tremendous number of people <hr /></blockquote> Quite a mouthful wasn't it. There is another way of saying this, there have been a tremendous number of people breaking the law.

Yeah, that sounds better. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r

SpiderMan
07-31-2003, 08:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote rackmup:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Blackwolf:</font><hr> Can you discuss the anything on it's merits without resorting to ad hominem statements? <hr /></blockquote>

Nope.

And, I don't even like Hominem's music. I think it's terrible the things he says about his mom in his songs. OPC does however like the song, "Superman."

Regards,

Ken (we're talking about "sincerity" and "commitment" and Blackwolf wants to talk about a Rap musician. Hmmpphh /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif) <hr /></blockquote>

"Ed Homonymn" a rap musician? More likely a kid bound for that new school in New York. Or maybe he just rhymes with one.

SpiderMan

rina
08-02-2003, 02:47 AM
As we are debating here, let there be no misunderstanding of my intentions. This post is not an assault on Christianity or any other religion.
It is indispensable for me to look for the truth and study comparative religion because if I would like to know whether a religion is true or false, I should not depend on my emotions, feelings, or traditions. Rather, I should depend on my reason and intellect. When God sent the prophets, He supported them with miracles and evidences, which proved that they were truly prophets, send by God and that the religion they came with was true.

My question is do you believe in the information declared in the following sites or not:


IS THE BIBLE GODS WORD?
http://www.jamaat.net/bible/Bible1-3.html

The Bible - A Closer Look!
http://www.todayislam.com/bible.htm

A List of Biblical Contradictions
http://sultan.org/articles/biblecon.txt

THE REAL STORY OF MARY
http://geocities.com/SoHo/Gallery/3001/storyofmary.htm

Christ in Islam
http://home2.swipnet.se/~w-20479/Christ.htm

THE TRUTH ABOUT JESUS
http://sultan.org/articles/Jesus.html

Who Was Jesus According to Jesus?
http://www.islaminfo.com

500 Errors
http://www.jamaat.net/

Examining The Bible
http://www.islamic-awareness.org/Bible/

http://www.islamland.org/articles1/a009.htm

Rod
08-02-2003, 09:45 AM
Who is debating? Certainly not you with two posts. Your intention is to agitate, hit and run. Don't walk in wearing a clown suit and not expect a few laughs.

bluewolf
08-02-2003, 10:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote rina:</font><hr> As we are debating here, let there be no misunderstanding of my intentions. This post is not an assault on Christianity or any other religion.
It is indispensable for me to look for the truth and study comparative religion because if I would like to know whether a religion is true or false, I should not depend on my emotions, feelings, or traditions. Rather, I should depend on my reason and intellect. When God sent the prophets, He supported them with miracles and evidences, which proved that they were truly prophets, send by God and that the religion they came with was true.

<hr /></blockquote>

It is all just about faith, man!!!

"For those without faith, no proof is possible,
for those with faith, no proof is necessary."

Laura

TomBrooklyn
08-18-2003, 06:39 PM
Brian Whitaker.
Monday August 11, 2003 The Guardian

There are two kinds of internet cafe in the Middle East: those where you sit with your back to the wall, and those where you don't.

The importance of these seating arrangements should not be underestimated: having your back to the wall means nobody can look over your shoulder to check what you are up to. In other words, it is a discreet way of signalling that the cafe has a laid-back attitude towards pornography.

I first came across this phenomenon a few years ago at an internet cafe in downtown Beirut. Not only were all the screens turned to face the wall but large partitions between the desks prevented users from taking a sideways peek at their neighbour's screen. Clearly, nobody went there to download the sermons of Hizbullah mullahs, and it took some time to clear away all the sexy pop-ups left by previous users before I could check my email.

Scandalous behaviour by internet users has been exercising religious authorities in the Middle East for some time. According to a Saudi scholar, internet pornography was even foretold by the Prophet as one of the evils that would occur just before the day of judgement.

It was presumably as a result of religious prompting that the telecommunications ministry in Yemen issued new regulations for internet cafes last June. To discourage customers from "committing immoral acts", the cafe owners were ordered to remove partitions and turn their screens to public view. "Moral instructions" for internet use must also be posted on the walls.

According to the Yemen Observer newspaper, the 265 cafes in the capital, Sana'a, saw their income drop by 50% overnight, and some have already closed.

The cafe owners, meanwhile, have formed an organisation to defend their business and have come up with a cunning argument against the removal of partitions: it discriminates against women. Partitions allow women internet users to be segregated from men in accordance with Islamic custom, they say, and removing them in effect deprives women of their right to use the internet.

"Immoral" use of the internet is only one side of the picture, however. Despite the fears of religious authorities, Muslims around the world - even those who seek to emulate the simple, non-technological lifestyle of the Prophet - have been quick to adopt the internet for religious purposes.

The religious uses that Muslims make of the internet are discussed in a new book, Islam in the Digital Age, by Gary Bunt. Dr Bunt, who teaches in the theology department at Lampeter University in Wales, has made a speciality of researching what he calls "cyber Islamic environments".

When his first book, Virtually Islamic, was published just over three years ago, cyber Islam seemed like an interesting but rather specialised field. Subsequent events, such as the Palestinian uprising and the September 11 attacks, have given it extra relevance and these are taken into account in his latest book, which focuses on two particular aspects: "online fatwas" and "e-jihad".

Conventional jihad covers various forms of religious struggle, and e-jihad is much the same.

At one level it is basically a form of propaganda or campaigning - using the internet to spread ideas or specific views of Islam. At another, it involves disrupting opponents by technological means - hacking, cracking, etc. A third type of e-jihad is used for organisational purposes, such as sending coded instructions to al-Qaida operatives.

The Palestinian uprising brought an increase in hacking throughout the Middle East, and Israeli ".il" websites were the main victims. Out of 1,295 known cyber attacks in the region between July 1999 and April 2002, 42% were directed against Israel, though Arab and Islamic sites were also attacked by pro-Israeli hackers.

Probably the most spectacular attack occurred when "Doctor Nuker" of the Pakistan Hackerz Club broke into the US-based website of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (Aipac), extracted its emailing list of 3,500 names, together with the credit card details of 700 of the organisation's donors, and published them online.

A possibly more important and far-reaching development is use of the internet for ijtihad and the issuing of fatwas. Ijtihad, essentially, is the interpretation of the Koran, the sayings of the Prophet and other material in order to determine how Muslims should conduct their daily lives. This process may result in a fatwa (religious ruling) issued by a recognised scholar.

On-line fatwas usually take a Q&amp;A format where a named imam, or sometimes a team of religious scholars, provides guidance to questioners. Some of these have built up into substantial, searchable databases covering just about every imaginable topic.

One result of this, Dr Bunt suggests, is that "issues which could be considered dangerous or embarrassing to raise within a domestic framework can be presented to an 'authority', locally or globally, or indeed from a different cultural-religious outlook".

Several fatwa sites - such as Islam Q&amp;A, Fatwa-Online and Islam-Online - offer mainstream Sunni views, while others have very different perspectives.

The merit - or defect - of the internet is that now almost anyone can set themselves up as an authority, make pronouncements, offer "Islamic advice" and issue fatwas. For some, this introduces an element of democracy; for others, anarchy.

Potentially, it opens up the field for all sorts of new and alternative interpretations of Islam alongside the more traditional versions. [But] While some Muslims might view diversity as part of the rich tapestry of religious experience, many others insist that there is only one correct way to do
things (which, of course, happens to be their own particular way).

·Islam in the Digital Age: E-jihad, Online Fatwas and Cyber Islamic Environments, by Gary Bunt, Pluto Press. Paperback, £14.99

Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003

TomBrooklyn
08-18-2003, 07:14 PM
New York Times
Inmates Are Free to Practice Black Supremacist Religion, Judge Rules
By PAUL von ZIELBAUER

Until two weeks ago, Intelligent Tarref Allah, a 27-year-old Brooklyn native convicted of murder in 1995, was just a gang member in prison asking for special treatment.

For years, New York State prison officials would not allow Mr. Allah - who is known to inmates and guards by his new legal first name, Intelligent, or Intel - to openly practice what he describes as his religion, central tenets of which encourage self-analysis, meditation and a black supremacist message.

Mr. Allah is a Five Percenter, part of a black militant group that broke from the Nation of Islam in the 1960's. The name derives from the concept that only 5 percent of the world's people break free from the worship of a false "mystery God" and become gods to themselves and their families.

But on July 31, Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald of Federal District Court in Manhattan ruled that Mr. Allah is entitled to the same religious freedoms as the thousands of practicing Jews, Muslims, Christians, Hare Krishnas and Wiccans incarcerated in New York State's prisons.

The ruling was groundbreaking because it would force state prison officials to allow Five Percenters to have access to the literature and carry out the rituals of what they say is their religion, the Nation of Gods and Earths.

Judge Buchwald also ordered state prison officials to report back to her within 60 days on their progress in accommodating Five Percenter requests for monthly "parliament" meetings; special prison dinner menus and
post-sundown cafeteria schedules during periods of fasting; and special celebrations during Five Percenter holy days, including the birthdays of Elijah Muhammad, the Nation of Islam founder, and Clarence 13X Smith, the founder of the Nation of Gods and Earths.

"They have to accommodate all of their practices, and if they can't accommodate them, they have to show a compelling reason why they shouldn't," said Damore Viola, a lawyer with Sullivan &amp; Cromwell, the prestigious Manhattan law firm that represented Mr. Allah in his lawsuit.