PDA

View Full Version : the one tip that helped you the most



shoot2thrill
07-31-2003, 04:17 PM
ok everybody what was the one playing tip that you got that helped your game the most.and do you remember who gave it to .mine would be. a good pre-shot and relax and get really comfortable.(jimmy reid). it improved my game 75%
SHOOT TO THRILL
BUT
PLAY TO KILL!!!

Cueless Joey
07-31-2003, 04:24 PM
The biggest secret here.
The pause/quiet eye theory.

rackmup
07-31-2003, 04:26 PM
That one's easy:

"Relax, have fun, this isn't your source of income."

-Buddy Hall @ Sam's Town Great American Sports Bar, Las Vegas, NV. during a guest appearance/challenge match.

Regards,

Ken

UWPoolGod
07-31-2003, 04:53 PM
Never let go of the shot if you even have a hint of an idea that you might miss. Stand up and start over.

BillPorter
07-31-2003, 05:24 PM
Ok, Joey, please remind me about the "pause/quiet eye theory." I recall a thread where this was being discussed, but can't bring the detrails back to mind. Thanks in advance.

Barbara
07-31-2003, 05:25 PM
All the ones I got from Trenton Marty, Dawn Hopkins, Joe Tucker, Randy Goettlicher, and Fran!

And all the other little people just hanging around while I was playing and felt the need to say something to me to help my game.

Barbara~~~is it ever really just one?

Cueless Joey
07-31-2003, 05:35 PM
Bill,
Before the last stroke, stop on the cb, look at the ob for 2 seconds or more then shoot without moving your eyes.

BillPorter
07-31-2003, 06:04 PM
Thanks, Joey. I plan to give that a try tomorrow at the PH. Guess it kind of gives your eye and brain a moment to "quieten" down and focus. I missed a couple of ball-in-hands playing one-hole today and was really disgusted. So I was looking for a tip....sounds like a good one.

Cueless Joey
07-31-2003, 06:06 PM
Bill, you're game just went up a ball. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

BillPorter
07-31-2003, 06:14 PM
Joey,I'll send you a jelly roll out of my next score! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Keith Talent
07-31-2003, 07:23 PM
It was at a cheap little seaside bar in Asbury Park in 1980. Guy tells this ragged young, half-talented, bar box shooter, me, three totally basic and useful things:
1) Stop jerking that shoulder around ... stroke from the elbow down.
2) Keep the cue as level as you can.
3) So, you think you'd like to get a motorcycle? Tap my leg about here. It was plastic. Still got both of my own, fortunately. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Rich R.
08-01-2003, 04:52 AM
"Keep it simple." -- from Scott Lee.

pooltchr
08-01-2003, 06:10 AM
Take what the table gives you! Determine what the natural path of the balls is, and if necessary, alter it as little as possible to get the response you need. (Don't run the cue ball 3 rails around when a simple stun shot will do)

cheesemouse
08-01-2003, 06:18 AM
keep your feet busy while lining up.

Candyman
08-01-2003, 06:33 AM
Pre-shot and stroke, courtesy of Scott Lee. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

bolo
08-01-2003, 08:16 AM
Take a reality check, It is not life and death. Best advice I ever got, he was right.

BillPorter
08-01-2003, 08:25 AM
Stay down on the shot! Of course, the tip only helps me when I heed it! I think I play my best when I consciously tell myself, ON EVERY SHOT, to stay down and finish the shot. Jumping up on shots has been, for many years, the second worse flaw in my game. (A shortened final backstroke combined with a jerky "punch" at the cue ball being my worst flaw. Hey, I don't do it on every shot, just the most important ones. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif)

HalSmith
08-01-2003, 08:49 AM
One of the best tips I ever got was to order two drinks when the waitress come by cause you never know when she'll be back. The other one was never bank what you can cut.---Smitty

Sid_Vicious
08-01-2003, 08:52 AM
Best tip: Listen to everybody, nobody is supremely endowed and knows it all, a novice might be wiser than a world beater. You shouldn't adopt everything you hear mind you, but don't fall guilty to saying, "Naaa, that guy can't play, he can't tell me nuthin'!" You'll be surprised at what you are missing with that uppity attitude. This has to be the absolute best tip I every had. Btw, you do have to filter out the nonsense, but you can still be patiently congenial and hear what the person is saying before you discard it...sid

bluewolf
08-01-2003, 09:23 AM
Scott helped me a lot with my stroke, but best tip for me:

set,pause, finish, freeze-randy g

Laura

socrates
08-01-2003, 09:42 AM
Learn to develop the ability to sense that the entire length of the cue is on the line of the shot.

Also can be described as learning to sense where the butt of the cue behind your grip hand is aimed. It should be on the dead line of the shot.

Personally, after learning to develop this sensation I was able to make the small adjustments in my stance and alignment so that the entire length of the cue was falling on the line naturally.

Fran Crimi
08-01-2003, 10:45 AM
Buddy Hall: If you're not having a good time while you're in the heat of it, then either change your attitude fast, or quit, because you're going to lose the match.

Best advice I ever got.

Fran

SPetty
08-01-2003, 11:34 AM
Shape ain't sh!t without the shot!

jjinfla
08-01-2003, 12:04 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote UWPoolGod:</font><hr> Never let go of the shot if you even have a hint of an idea that you might miss. Stand up and start over. <hr /></blockquote>

How true that is. And how hard it is to do. And how many times I wished I would have taken that advice as I watched my shot miss exactly the way my mind was telling me it would. Must learn to listen to my angel. Jake

Hopster
08-01-2003, 01:34 PM
My game went up since i started keeping my eye on the ball for the ENTIRE shot. I will zero in on the exact spot and stay on it the whole shot. Its tougher than it sounds beleive it or not but it works for me.
That and taking a lot of speed of my shots and keeping my stroking arm straight, courtesy of Fran. I never realized i was doing that till she pointed it out.

Snyder1
08-01-2003, 01:44 PM
I read someone here say imagine balancing a wine glass on your elbow during your shot ... helped me immeasurably. Close second is ... DON'T HIT IT TOO HARD ... POSITION, MAN, POSITION !!

Qtec
08-01-2003, 02:30 PM
Dont hit the white , hit THROUGH the white.


Its never over till its over .

Accept bad luck . $hit happens .

Respect your opponent. Never underestimate , it makes you sloppy.

If you want to win , know your limitations and play accordingly.

Never show fear on a pool table . It will only benefit your opponent .


Above all , play your own game , never follow your opponent , make him follow you .


Qtec

BillPorter
08-01-2003, 04:22 PM
Sounds like Nick Varner's advice about trying to watch the cue ball all the way until it strikes the object ball. Try to actually SEE the collision said Nick (at least that's what someone SAID that Nick said).

HOWARD
08-01-2003, 04:40 PM
Mine came from three places, books about visualization of
the athletic movement, and from the Hustler, "its piece of
wood - it has nerves in it ... my arm feels like it is oiled" - And from Sax Dalporto - its the stroke, anybody can
walk up to the table and shoot the balls into the pocket.

A few years later those items came together. To see myself in my minds eye stroking the cue ball - feeling like my arm is oiled and stroke is smooth as glass.

Howard

Ralph S.
08-01-2003, 05:10 PM
SLOW DOWN..TAKE YOUR TIME! Heard that from Scott right away.

shoot2thrill
08-01-2003, 06:07 PM
WOW NO REALLY WOOOW
I thought there would be a pattern here but everyone's kinda spread out with there tips .if everyone who reads this post doesn't come away with a better knowledge of the game there a rock! you guys really got some good stuff.now can anyone tell me WHATS THE WHITE BALL FOR??? LOL LOL

BillPorter
08-01-2003, 06:15 PM
The white ball is used to kill roaches that sometimes live at the bottom of the pockets.... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

pooljunkie73
08-01-2003, 08:16 PM
Respect few, fear none.


Play the table, not the opponet.

griffith_d
08-01-2003, 09:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote jjinfla:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote UWPoolGod:</font><hr> Never let go of the shot if you even have a hint of an idea that you might miss. Stand up and start over. <hr /></blockquote>

How true that is. And how hard it is to do. And how many times I wished I would have taken that advice as I watched my shot miss exactly the way my mind was telling me it would. Must learn to listen to my angel. Jake <hr /></blockquote>

That is because your mind wished it that way,...your mind said you were going to miss it,...the body obeys. Start wishing the balls in, see it, believe it, make it(in your head) and the ball will fall.

Griff

phil in sofla
08-02-2003, 08:26 PM
From Mr. George Fels:

1) use fewer rails
2) use inside English

From Canadian Dan

'Make the ball' a couple of times in your practice stroking. That is, 'see' yourself making the shot, vividly (pocketing and shape for the next shot), during the last couple of practice strokes

sack316
08-03-2003, 03:17 AM
the tip that helps me the most is the tip on my cue (sorry, too easy). The quick ones that come to mind are "Why are you trying to make things so hard when you could just shoot natural and make it easy?" (thanks Wai Pang) and then of course the classic "if the offensive shot is harder than the defensive shot, just play defense. You may make a great shot offensively, but you could hook yourself after that, why not get ball in hand and then run out?" (thanks Pork Chop).
My usual tip to others is "Remember, this game is easy, I mean look- 2 balls can fit in the pocket at once, but all you have to shoot in is one at the time"

nhp
08-03-2003, 05:59 AM
Only punch your opponent in the face if you lose

bluewolf
08-03-2003, 06:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> From Mr. George Fels:

<hr /></blockquote>

Now this is interesting. Seems like most players do not like inside english. I cannot remember the book, but I read somewhere that most players avoid inside english like the plague. The inference I think was that they need to get past this.

I do not use much english in a match unless I am in the zone, in which case, I do not know what I am doing and do not remember what I did, just played above my typical play.

Laura

Qtec
08-03-2003, 10:08 AM
Forgot that one , thanks .



Never let your opponent know what state of mind you are in . Display no negative emotion .


Q

Bucko
08-07-2003, 10:24 PM
Laura,

Have you taken lessons from Randy G., and if so, where at? I have taken his class in Dallas, and a refresher class 2 weeks ago in my home area of Watertown, SD. He will be back in SD again sometime in the next several months. At that time I will take the advanced class. Definitely, set, pause, finish, freeze has helped my game very much.

Steve

SacTownTommy
08-07-2003, 11:31 PM
The Tip that most helped me learn to play better was from an older gentlemam in Memphis TN. The place was High Pockets pool room. Back in the 80s.

He was watching me play and asked me if it was alright if he suggested something about my pool game. I said sure.

He asked me to shoot a lag shot. This was easy.. I nailed it on the fist try coming within a balls distance of the rail.

He then asked me how may shots that I knew of in any game of pool traveled more than the 16 feet (referring to the distance of the lag shot)?

I replied, 'Not many shots travel that far" and his reply.. was "Then why would you hit the cue ball any harder than you just did to play this game?"

I slowed my game down and started to play better and have always remembered this "Tip". Pass it on.. I have over the last 20+ years.

Hopster
08-08-2003, 12:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SacTownTommy:</font><hr> The Tip that most helped me learn to play better was from an older gentlemam in Memphis TN. The place was High Pockets pool room. Back in the 80s.

He was watching me play and asked me if it was alright if he suggested something about my pool game. I said sure.

He asked me to shoot a lag shot. This was easy.. I nailed it on the fist try coming within a balls distance of the rail.

He then asked me how may shots that I knew of in any game of pool traveled more than the 16 feet (referring to the distance of the lag shot)?

I replied, 'Not many shots travel that far" and his reply.. was "Then why would you hit the cue ball any harder than you just did to play this game?"

I slowed my game down and started to play better and have always remembered this "Tip". Pass it on.. I have over the last 20+ years. <hr /></blockquote>

I like it.

Fred Agnir
08-08-2003, 07:09 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SacTownTommy:</font><hr>
He then asked me how may shots that I knew of in any game of pool traveled more than the 16 feet (referring to the distance of the lag shot)?

I replied, 'Not many shots travel that far" and his reply.. was "Then why would you hit the cue ball any harder than you just did to play this game?"<hr /></blockquote>Although I can certainly appreciate this tip, because I am a cynic I must ask: How many shots in a pool game do you fail to hit any object balls and still hope to win?

Fred

pooltchr
08-08-2003, 08:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SacTownTommy:</font><hr>
He then asked me how may shots that I knew of in any game of pool traveled more than the 16 feet (referring to the distance of the lag shot)?

I replied, 'Not many shots travel that far" and his reply.. was "Then why would you hit the cue ball any harder than you just did to play this game?"<hr /></blockquote>Although I can certainly appreciate this tip, because I am a cynic I must ask: How many shots in a pool game do you fail to hit any object balls and still hope to win?

Fred <hr /></blockquote>
I think the point is that you don't have to kill the ball to make the shot. Here's a test for you to try. Shoot a lag shot and see how far the cue ball travels. Then shoot a shot straight into an object ball at the same stroke speed, and you will see that the combined distance that both balls travel is almost the same as your lag shot. It's just a transfer of energy from one to the other. Very little energy is lost when the two balls hit. As a self proclaimed cynic, you should try this for yourself. I have, and it really is true.

Fred Agnir
08-08-2003, 08:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> I think the point is that you don't have to kill the ball to make the shot. Here's a test for you to try. Shoot a lag shot and see how far the cue ball travels. Then shoot a shot straight into an object ball at the same stroke speed, and you will see that the combined distance that both balls travel is almost the same as your lag shot. It's just a transfer of energy from one to the other. Very little energy is lost when the two balls hit. As a self proclaimed cynic, you should try this for yourself. I have, and it really is true. <hr /></blockquote> Well, I've done the test. What does it tell us compared to the original advice? The original tip question was "how many shots travel that far?"

If we're talking 14.1, then I suppose we can say, "not many." But in 9-ball, if adding up the distances is what we're talking about, and of course only using natural roll, then the answer would be "a lot." Add to the mix of losing energy to the cloth for draw shots, then the answer becomes, " a whole lot."

Let's be real here. A lag shot is a slow to very slow shot depending on how you want to define it. I think a natural shot for most people is still a few diamonds of rebound from a lag shot's second cushion.

And remember folks, you lose roughly half your speed when hitting a cushion at a natural roll. So that "few diamonds away" is roughly multiplied by two.

Fred &lt;~~~ thinks the advice is good, but needs some updating.

eg8r
08-08-2003, 09:23 AM
[ QUOTE ]
.mine would be. a good pre-shot and relax and get really comfortable.(jimmy reid). it improved my game 75%
<hr /></blockquote> Didn't you just list 3 tips? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

All joking aside, I think mine would be to stay down. I struggle everytime I am at the table with this. Sometimes it will get so bad that I am standing almost straight up during my pitiful follow through. When I am paying attention to that and making sure I stay down the whole time, I play much better.

An oldtimer in a little pool hall in Youngstown, OH caught on to this problem of mine right away. I was playing him for a cup of coffee and he was helping me along the way. I do not even remember his name, but he was a great shot. The guy behind the counter told me he never saw this older gentleman ever miss a shot. I just smiled and told him, "Well it is a good thing I only have to buy the coffee once a day, and take advantage of the free refills". We both laughed and I went on with my lessons. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r

eg8r
08-08-2003, 09:30 AM
LOL, Fred you are hilarious. I guess the old timer should have had Tom just shoot a ball into the pocket with lag speed to make his point. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

eg8r

Mike T.
08-08-2003, 09:45 AM
Keep the cue ball off the rail.

Mike T.

SacTownTommy
08-08-2003, 09:51 AM
Fred,
The "Tip" was related to my 'very' hard hitting (at that time in my life) style of play. I needed to slow down. This gentleman was kind enough to share a speed example (although somewhat on the extreme side) the "Tip" made its point.

I slowed down and my game got better. This "Tip" influenced my game for the better and I have been using it as an example for some 20+ years. It is an 'eye opener' to a lot of 'less than average' players.

It's just a "Tip" to us numbskulls that think that hitting balls hard will make them go into any pocket.. "

60 miles an hour 6 rails and 6 pockets.. they have to go some where..

08-08-2003, 10:20 AM

Bruins Fan
08-08-2003, 10:05 PM
The best advise i got was to start from the cb in the center then go with the english if needed.The advise i got from playing was to picture the contact point of the CB on the OB and the natural deflection of the CB.

Chalks Billiards
08-09-2003, 07:08 PM
When I opened my pool hall in 1990, I could barely hold the stick. A guy named Eddie(Freight train)Gregory came in and I traded him free pool if he would show me some things. In a few years I became a solid B player and could string 3-4 racks in a row. Eddie was amazing to watch, I learned everything I know about playing pool from him.

hogman
08-09-2003, 07:58 PM
When I was learning from a local player I asked about what a good stroke should feel like. He told me a good stroke feels like an even balance between looseness and control. It took a while for this to sink in, but I realized that when I am out of stroke, I am either too loose and the cue is wobbling around, or I am too tight and the cb isn't getting any action.

Also as for using more or fewer rails, Jim Rempe also says it is better to go more rails for easier speed control, but to go fewer rails if there is risk of running into table traffic.

charlieb
08-09-2003, 10:50 PM
Joey, thanks for the tip!! It helped me tremendously in as it has become part of my pre-shot thought process, and has helped me avoid the ocassional eye movement or flinch.

John in NH
08-11-2003, 05:24 PM
For me it's the break, I was always trying to hit the one ball too hard and the cue ball was out of control, thanks to Blackjack Dave Sapolis's tip keep it simple, concentrate on the center of the one ball using one tip below center, play cue ball to end in center of table for position, less chance of scratching, now my break is much better and I rarely scratch in a race to 7, if I make a ball on the break, I'm in a better position to control the rack.



Thanks Dave,

John

Sid_Vicious
08-11-2003, 07:10 PM
John...Do you attack the CB with a lunging body? Or have you taken some speed off to maintain accuracy during your break stroke???sid

Rod
08-11-2003, 07:18 PM
A Water Buffalo.

phil in sofla
08-11-2003, 07:44 PM
Maybe both ideas, using inside English and fewer rails, should be rephrased to 'learn how, practice, and become comfortable with inside English and using fewer rails, for those occasions where that is the correct play.'

One example is shooting a ball close to a rail at a slight angle. Often, a stun shot that goes to that rail and straight off and up table on a very predictable line is preferable to running the cue ball around two rails, where the vagaries of stroke and English can make that ball travel further than you thought it would, leaving you out of line.

Most of Mr. George Fels' 'rules' already come with the proviso, 'when possible or desirable.'

phil in sofla
08-11-2003, 07:48 PM
A little more thought and I came up with another two.

One, from Joe, the author of 'Guaranteed Improvement' and I think the "Secrets of the Rack,' was to get a Predator shaft.

The second, from CJ Wiley, is to deliberately aim to one side or the other of the pocket, to allow a full ball's width of error and still pocket the ball. Going into the middle of the pocket, about a 1/2 ball of error, either way, and you're running into the rails.

Cheating the pocket is normally used as a special situation technique. Wiley says to do it routinely.

Sid_Vicious
08-11-2003, 08:52 PM
"The second, from CJ Wiley, is to deliberately aim to one side or the other of the pocket, to allow a full ball's width of error and still pocket the ball."

That's a handy idea Phil. Thanks...sid

phil in sofla
08-12-2003, 09:29 AM
The extra fine point on which side to aim is the same side you're applying English, to allow for any throw effects.

That is, if you are shooting for the corner and using left for shape considerations, aim to the left side of the pocket. Any throw to the right from the left English, and you still have 2-1/2 inches or so for the ball to still go down. A great side benefit is that you get used to aiming at a half pocket, and then when you only have a half pocket because of a blocking ball, you can easily aim the shot that precisely, from experience.

Fred Agnir
08-12-2003, 10:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> The extra fine point on which side to aim is the same side you're applying English, to allow for any throw effects.

That is, if you are shooting for the corner and using left for shape considerations, aim to the left side of the pocket. <hr /></blockquote>IMO, it's this type of advice that stalls out progress.

Personally, it's a rare percentage for me to compensate for throw. Throw just isn't that important in the whole english-compensation scheme of things.

Fred

Rod
08-12-2003, 12:27 PM
I don't believe it is either Fred. I most always "USE" a pocket to a degree. That is not the same as cheating a pocket. Cheating is touching a point or rail into the pocket. Trying to compensate for throw is a bit of a lost leader. How far and what angle the o/b is to the pocket sure makes a difference. This can't be a blanket statement.

What happens if the stroke is off and/or the c/b squirts? It will find the end or side rail. Now we need to buy a predator shaft because we all know it eliminates squirt. Then we eliminate squirt and hit the wrong part of the pocket. Oh my, it's just never ending. LOL Just funnin! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Rod

Fred Agnir
08-12-2003, 12:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> Now we need to buy a predator shaft because we all know it eliminates squirt. Then we eliminate squirt and hit the wrong part of the pocket. Oh my, it's just never ending. LOL Just funnin! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Rod <hr /></blockquote>hehe. How true, how true. I've found that with the Predator or any other low squirt shaft, there's so much compensation you have to make when you shoot a slowish shot with english or a shot off the rail using english that the whole "use a Predator to make shots easier" is really misleading. IMO, it's a wash. You trade off less squirt for more effective swerve. I don't think that really helps most people.

Fred

Fred

John in NH
08-12-2003, 03:43 PM
Hi Sid,

If I execute the break successfully I am at 70 or 80 percent of my prior speed, my objective is to follow through to the one ball squarely in the center, I probably do lunge towards the one ball to a certain extent.

Regards,

John

phil in sofla
08-12-2003, 04:47 PM
Fred, I'm not aiming to the side of the pocket for the REASON of allowing for throw, which I also don't see coming up that much in my game, nor as I recall, does CJ Wiley mention that aspect of it as the reason.

What he said is compatible with aiming to the opposite side of the pocket from any English used, if that is a better line for shape on the next shot, and entirely ignoring any possible throw effects from that line.

The point is rather to aim to one side or the other, and then favor making any marginal change to that line on the side that gives you the ball-width sized margin of error, whether from English induced throw, collision induced throw, or simply slightly undercutting or overcutting the ball relative to a center pocket line.

But if you hit the cue ball 'flat', no spin, with a stun speed stroke (so it's skidding when it hits the object ball, no rolling), and at a slow speed, collision induced throw does come up, and enough to make the shot miss, as if you undercut the ball (when you really didn't).

This occasions the advice that when hitting a cut shot softer than your average stroke, overcut it a little compared to the line you would normally use.