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View Full Version : Elevating cue for long draw?



hogman
08-03-2003, 10:43 PM
On the last BcN broadcast (deuel vs. luat) they had a short instruction section featuring Buddy Hall executing a few different position shots. One of these was a table-length draw without hitting a cushion, a shot that I have been having trouble with for some time. I noticed that Hall had elevated his cue slightly on the shot, maybe 2 or 3 inches. I had been doing long draw shots by keeping my cue almost perfectly level, hitting the ball very low, almost hitting the cloth at the same time, and following through 6 or 7 inches. I get great draw this way at close distances, but when drawing from a table length away I could not seem to keep the cue ball spinning backwards.


When I tried elevating the cue slightly and hitting a point a bit higher on the cue ball, and with a shorter follow-through, I got much better long distance draw. The cueball feels like it rebounds off of the object ball and then the draw catches, bringing it back. The only problem was that I tended to miscue a bit more, but then again I am not used to using this kind of stroke. I then noticed in a few accu-stat matches that for power draws the players appear to be elevating the cue slightly. It feels like I have found the key to this shot, but on the other hand I have been told to keep the cue level on draw shots. So is the correct way to shoot a table length draw with a slightly elevated cue, or am I traveling down the wrong road?

Fred Agnir
08-04-2003, 06:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote hogman:</font><hr> So is the correct way to shoot a table length draw with a slightly elevated cue, or am I traveling down the wrong road? <hr /></blockquote>I'm sure you'll get a lot of posts against, but I've been in favor of this method for a long time now. For me and anyone I've ever shown, it's more a matter of body mechanics than physics.

There's a lot of talk about "keep it simple." And that "level as possible" is "simple as possible." IMO, that statement needs to be rechecked. I think there's a lot of things about body mechanics that dictate something counter-intuitive to what most instructors voice as "simple as possible."

Fred &lt;~~~ slighltly elevated

mark wilson
08-04-2003, 06:15 AM
Elevated cue strokes will cause the cueball to be slightly airborn which reduces backspin from the friction of forward bounce.However you can still obtain backspin this way, you will have to work harder than others with a more level cue. Some minor elevation is generally caused from shooting over the rail but attempt to minimize the cue angle and gain backspin volume. Buddy Hall happens to be a tall man playing a standard length cue and he seems to hit slightly downward on every shot, with Hall of Fame success I might add. I suspect that the reason you feel the need to hit downward is you have some upper arm movement with the stroke delivery and as the arm falls the tip moves upward reducing backspin and causing a long follow-through.You can learn to obtain the results this way but with extra motion consistency is more difficult.

SpiderMan
08-07-2003, 01:57 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mark wilson:</font><hr> Elevated cue strokes will cause the cueball to be slightly airborn which reduces backspin from the friction of forward bounce.<hr /></blockquote>

Unless the resistance to rotation supplied by the cloth is enough to cause the cue tip to slip on the ball (miscue), any reduction in initial backspin would be negligible. With no slippage, the surface of the ball must move with the tip, regardless of a slight additional resistance. If the stroke is identical (including angle of incidence with respect to geometric center of the ball), you should get a similar amount of initial backspin.

Many players apparently get an effective "long draw" using an elevated cue. Perhaps the reason is that the bouncing path of the cue, having less contact time with the table surface, means less of the initial backspin is lost to friction with the cloth. Of course, there is some "air time" even with a level cue when hit below center, but it is probably greater using this "jump draw".

SpiderMan