PDA

View Full Version : What is the best way to improve your game!



preacherman
08-18-2003, 09:45 PM
As I mentioned in another post. I know PRACTICE (just you and the table) is VERY important. But where do you all rate:
1. Local Tournaments
2. Leagues
3. Challenging large area tournaments
4. Watching (and I mean really watch PRO's on video)
5. Read really good pool books
6. Playing with buddies
7. Other: ___________________________.

Personally, playing with low skilled players has likely hurt me the most.

Personally, I try to play players that are above my level a lttle bit, but not extremely better than me (as in those games all I do is watch them play). This seems to help (if you don't mind losing as part of your training).

Look forward to your input.

Thanks,
Jim - A proud Atlantan /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
www.christianpoolplayers.com (http://www.christianpoolplayers.com)

bluewolf
08-19-2003, 04:45 AM
Books do me very little good unless they have pictures showing how to do a shot like 99 crit shots. Am sure books are great for others because ww likes them, just dont do me much good, is all. Depends on what kind of learner you are I am thinking.

Accustat tapes are good for me to the extent that they get me motivated. Ocasionally I can find something to steal from one of the players. For ex- I was having trouble with getting a good bridge months ago. Archer's looked good, so I started using that.

Real matches do me more good than with buddies. I need that additional pressure to bring out my best. But, then, I have found a method so that I rarely choke. If a person is a huge choker, buddy matchups might be good until a person finds out what the problem is with a qualified teacher.

That is my very humble opinion based on my limited experience only.

Laura

pooltchr
08-19-2003, 06:03 AM
I would have to rank "OTHER" as the number one way to improve your game. Get a professional instructor (One who knows what he or she is doing!) and work with them. An instructor can evaluate your game and help pinpoint the flaws that need correction. A few hours spent this way will do more than all the books and videos you can find. Spend some serious time practicing the things you and your instructor determine need the time. Then go out and play in those tournaments. With a little luck and some hard work, you just might earn back more than the cost of the lessons.

jjinfla
08-19-2003, 06:41 AM
Definitely get an instructor. But one who can work at whatever level you are at. Unfortunately, the one and only instructor I ever had is not very good at being an instructor. A good pool player (at one time) but not a good instructor. So, as a result I had to teach myself (it's called having an idiot for an instructor), reading books, watching videos, watching the pros play in person etc. As a result I learned a lot of incorrect information because I did not really understand what the written word or video was portraying and developed bad habits and then when realization would set in I would have to relearn the material the correct way. As a result I lost a lot of valuable time in getting to where I am now. But at least, as Bob Fancher says, I do really enjoy getting on the table and enjoy myself with the "Pleasures of Small Motions". Jake

preacherman
08-19-2003, 06:45 AM
I agree that a private instructor is the best!
I have had that when time and money allows.
But sometimes like NOW, time and money won't
allow for that, so what would you say is the
"second" best way to improve, after a personal
instructor.

Jim
www.christianpoolplayers.com (http://www.christianpoolplayers.com)

TomBrooklyn
08-19-2003, 08:08 AM
One good way is to have a rival. If you manage to match up with someone you can't beat but you would like to very much, it can provide a strong useful motivation to improve.

TomBrooklyn
08-19-2003, 08:08 AM
One good way is to have a rival. If you manage to match up with someone you can't beat but you would like to very much, it can provide a strong useful motivation to improve.

preacherman
08-19-2003, 08:17 AM
Tom,
I agree with this. I currently have found a "sparring" partner for the purpose of challenging my game. We are about equal. I think he will atleast keep me on my toes
instead of just playing around on the table with players
that don't challenge me.

Thanks,
Jim
www.christianpoolplayers.com (http://www.christianpoolplayers.com)

dmgwalsh
08-19-2003, 08:22 AM
A couple of hours with Scott Lee only costs $100 and you get a video of your session as well. He gives you plenty to work on for months. In the long run, it's probably better than books, videos and table time ill spent.

I also find some of Bert Kinister's tapes helpful. Black Belt Billiards has a lot of drills. Target Pool is ok.

randyg
08-19-2003, 08:33 AM
PREACHERMAN. There are three fundamental aspects to learning our game. PSYCHOLOGICAL-MENTAL-PHYSICAL. To continue to improve, one must fully understand all three aspects and keep them in balance.

Not all of these are fun, but they could be.
Not all of these are results orientated, nor can they be.
Not all of these are learned at the table, but will be applied there.
BCA MASTER INSTRUCTOR randyg

Fred Agnir
08-19-2003, 08:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote preacherman:</font><hr> As I mentioned in another post. I know PRACTICE (just you and the table) is VERY important. But where do you all rate:
1. Local Tournaments
2. Leagues
3. Challenging large area tournaments
4. Watching (and I mean really watch PRO's on video)
5. Read really good pool books
6. Playing with buddies
7. Other: ___________________________.<hr /></blockquote>

It always seems like my game elevates a notch when I watch professionals in person. I think that a lot of pool players (even on this board) simply have no idea what the pros actually do, and what they're capable of doing.

It's also very important IMO when watching the pros to watch their rhythm, balance, cadence. If you take professional instruction, see how it relates to professionals. Watch the eyes, watch how they walk around the table. Most of the professionals will give every indication in the world what they're thinking pattern-wise.

They'll also indicate whether they got where they wanted to. That's usually the "flip the hand palm up" move when they don't quite get there.

These are just some things you won't see on Accustats, your local tournament/league, or the professional instruction.

Don't get me wrong, everything on your list are should-do if you hope to improve. Tthat includes taking professional lessons.

Fred

Scott Lee
08-19-2003, 10:28 AM
Jim...I have told you this many times before! Improve the QUALITY of your stroke, and your overall game will improve dramatically. That is done with very specific practice. Just "practice" itself, will not necessarily improve your game. Practice drills do not have to be 'boring'. Nor do they have to be practiced for hours at a time to have relevance or results. The drills I have showed you should take NO MORE than an hour (and really only 20 minutes, once you get them down). They are stairstepped, cover almost all aspects of your game, and go from incredibly easy to perform, all the way to somewhat difficult (in 5 exercises).
There is no magic pill...but these will work, when done with dedication and discipline!

Scott

griffith_d
08-19-2003, 12:09 PM
I agree with Scott,..the perfection of your stroke will help the most. We can all make "the shot", it is how many times in a row you can make that will tell the difference.

After the stroke is at its best, then go for learning the diamond system, kicks and banks and make them many times in a row no matter where the CB and OB are placed.

Also, perform the 3 ball runout, then 4 ball, then 5 and so on until you cannot miss.

Keep learning more shots to put in your arsenal until your game is at its highest,....then you will really be good.

Griff

bluewolf
08-19-2003, 12:37 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr>
BCA MASTER INSTRUCTOR randyg <hr /></blockquote>

Now that you mention it, knowing Jim, I think that he would really like your school, Randy. Interactive, fun, and learn a lot.

scott- i believe that a person must trust their stroke, not just have a good stroke.

Laura

preacherman
08-19-2003, 04:37 PM
Hi Scott,
I disappeared from the CCB forum for awhile, but here I am!

I agree with all you have said, and I still do your drills (and others at times).

It has been almost 1 1/2 years since you gave me my first lesson and I guess around a year since my last lesson from you. I also have recieved lessons from other professionals. My stroke is likely better than it ever was when you last saw me. BUT in the last few months I have not had a chance to be in a league, play in any tournaments, and get few lessons. I think all that has hurt my game of late. The only thing I have been able to do is practice and play with newbies. I do feel that I personally need the element of challenge (if when I come up on the losing end). Which I don't feel usually playing alone.

Thanks for your reply and stay in touch!

Jim :-)
www.christianpoolplayers.com (http://www.christianpoolplayers.com)

preacherman
08-19-2003, 04:49 PM
Hi Randy,
Thanks for your 3 part answer.

To which I say - YES, YES, YES.

I really enjoy pool, and have my own 8' Brunswick with Simonis cloth. I will play for hours on it, usually until someone quit on me.

Also I do enjoy practicing more than not practicing, and if I don't keep track of the time, an hour or two (in practice) will fly by. But it just doesn't compare to
the enjoyment of a good match (even if I lose).

Thanks again,
Jim "Preacherman"
www.christianpoolplayers.com (http://www.christianpoolplayers.com)

preacherman
08-19-2003, 04:55 PM
Thanks for the input especially about the Pro's. I was at BCA tournament in May (in Las Vegas). And I studied the pro's and learned alot, I learn by tape too, but in person is by far the best. Studying their every move I have found many things otherwise overlooked. It's not near the same reading it from a book. You have to SEE it!

Thanks again,
Jim
www.christianpoolplayers.com (http://www.christianpoolplayers.com)

jjinfla
08-19-2003, 05:33 PM
As I see it Preach, without an instructor it is very, very hard to improve. It can be done but you must study a lot.
Because to improve you have to change, or improve, something you are presently doing at the table. But how do you know what to change? What are your weaknesses? What is the stumbling block holding you back? That's what an instructor can show you.

I have found a strange phenomenon with pool players. They want to remain better than who they play and as a result they are not exactly free with helpful advice. They will just let you keep making the same mistakes over and over.
And some, believe it or not, will actually give you false info. Especially if you start beating them.

But I do agree that playing someone who is slightly better than you pushes you to play the best you can. It just won't correct any defects you have. And you may pick up his bad habits.

Of course you can watch how he plays patterns. But even that can be deceiving because he may be setting up for a shot that he is comfortable with while you may find it a low percentage shot. I personally like cut shots and am amazed when someone is banking when the cut is so easy.

And above all get advice from the better players, not a "C" player like me, even though I did stay in a Holiday Inn a few times. LOL

Over the past five years I have met a lot of pool players, many of whom I thought were pretty good. But now I am better than most of them and I realized that they really were not that good to begin with. But about 90% of them are still playing at the same level, or worse, then when I met them. They have reached a level and stay there. They keep missing the same shots the same way and never know why, and never bother to change. Maybe they hope for Divine intervention, but of course we both know that the Lord helps him who helps himself. He provides us with instructors so it is not His fault if we don't use them.

Jake

preacherman
08-19-2003, 10:18 PM
I would agree that an instructor will likely see a lot of things you are doing wrong and don't know it - And he'll spot it.

He'll also see things you can't see because you are shooting (from your view) and he is watching from any view he chooses.

Thanks for the input,
Jim "preacherman"
www.christianpoolplayers.com (http://www.christianpoolplayers.com)

08-20-2003, 11:11 AM

Eric.
08-20-2003, 01:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote whitewolf:</font><hr> I think all of you CCBers
<font color="red">You know, Ray? All your posts seem to start with this attitude. You come across as a bitter, close-minded person that just can't seem to see eye to eye with most of the people you come in contact with. </font color>


should come to the US Open so that Bluewolf can analyze the inner workings of your brain.

<font color="red">Show me a Psych. degree and I'll consider it. Truthfully, I think she isn't just the President, but a patient too. </font color>

After you know how you mind works (right brained/left brained for instance), we can best taylor your practices etc. to fit your personality so that you can reap the full benefits of all of the great teachers on this forum.

<font color="red"> You're too funny /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif </font color>

I had better stop here; this is sounding too much like an advertisement. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif And besides, I haven't discussed this with Laura yet.

<font color="red"> That discussion or any with her, for that matter, must take up most of your waking hours </font color>

First come first serve. Try it over the internet. Sorry Rackmup that you won't be there. She would have to see you in person and give you a battery of tests to figure you out. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

ww <hr /></blockquote>

I haven't met you, Ray but due to this new-fangled Internet thing that Al Gore invented, I think I have an idea where you're coming from. I get the impression that you can't stand amost people here. That's fine, your life. But WHY, WHY do you keep coming here?! Do you just love to bitch and moan? Is that when your happiest? Dammit, man-life is short. Why don't you spend more time and energy on things you enjoy? Personally, I don't go outta my way to make posts like this so I guess you sucked me in. I'll leave off and say:

If someone sh!ts in your coffee cup, don't angrily drink out of it, GET ANOTHER ONE.

Get it?

Eric

bluewolf
08-20-2003, 02:32 PM
[quote=Eric


Eric <hr /></blockquote>

Hey, Eric, this is all pretty silly. I do have a degree in psychology but not in sports psychology. It is those with degrees in sports psychology that do what whitewolf suggests. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

From what I read here,anyway, most of the ccbers play fine.

Laura

bluewolf
08-20-2003, 02:38 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote whitewolf:</font><hr>
First come first serve. Try it over the internet. Sorry Rackmup that you won't be there. She would have to see you in person and give you a battery of tests to figure you out. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

ww <hr /></blockquote>

Hey, whitewolf, Ken and I had our little round and things are pretty quiet now.I would prefer to keep it that way and do not notice ken bothering you right now.

CCB is kind of like a family. Some people you get along with better than others, sometimes you fight, and then make up and do fine again, but still family. And there is nobody on this board that I would not help if they needed it, because this is family.

Laura

bigbro6060
08-20-2003, 07:55 PM
Pressure match practice is very important

I disagree that playing players beneath your level is of no value

It is actually hard to beat someone you should beat, the pressure is on you, they have no pressure and can stroke away, your ego is on the line, there's isn't. You will encounter players in tournaments who you should easily beat, how will you be prepared mentally for these matchups if you don't practice against such players ?

I would highly recommend videotaping your techniques and analyzing them both by yourself and with an instructor

it's one thing for an instructor to tell you you are doing something wrong, it's another and it really hits home when you see yourself doing that thing wrong

Blackwolf
08-20-2003, 09:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Eric.:</font><hr> <font color="red">All [Ray's] posts start with this attitude: ...bitter, close-minded.

[bluewolf] isn't just the President [of a psychiatric practice], but a patient too. </font color>

It is you who is making psychological evaluations now. Please describe your qualifications and credentials to do so.

<font color="red">Ray, you can't stand most people here. That's fine, your life. But WHY do you keep coming here?</font color>

I'm having trouble reconciling this aspect of your evaluation and conclusion. Please elaborate on why, if Ray's attitude is his own business, it is appropriate to intervene with his choice to post on the forum?<hr /></blockquote>

Blackwolf
08-20-2003, 09:47 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf (in red):</font><hr><font color="red"> I do have a degree in psychology but not in sports psychology.</font color>

Close enough.
Do you do ink blot tests?

<font color="red"> Anyway, most of the ccbers play fine.</font color>

Your being too modest. Even the best players desire to tweak their game to garner any possible advantage. Please share your insights into the twisted minds of any posters or players as applicable.

bolo
08-21-2003, 02:28 AM
Be natural, and go from there.

bluewolf
08-21-2003, 07:48 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Blackwolf:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf (in red):</font><hr><font color="red"> I do have a degree in psychology but not in sports psychology.</font color>

Close enough.
Do you do ink blot tests?

Your being too modest. Even the best players desire to tweak their game to garner any possible advantage. Please share your insights into the twisted minds of any posters or players as applicable. <hr /></blockquote>

I have done ink blot (Rorschach) tests and other personality tests. Each person has something special and good about them. It is all just a matter of perspective. Well...everybody but certain handles appearing to be not the real person but an alternative handle, an anon. I was talking about real people here.

Are you real? Or are you one of several personalities belonging to a person with multiple personality disorder? I think that you realize, I know who you are.

Laura