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PQQLK9
08-19-2003, 07:17 AM
http://www.onthewirebilliards.com/0803hopkins.html

Hopster
08-19-2003, 07:16 PM
This is from the interview, i am really surprised Allan said this but i have read of similar things about Willie so its got to have some merit to it. Just surprising is all.

Q As a kid, who did you look up to and why?
A “I didn’t really look up to anyone, I wanted to see certain players play, and kind of wasn’t really wasn’t impressed when I went to see them play. Maybe I just got to see some bad matches but I remember my father taking me to see Mosconi play an exhibition match in Hillside, NJ. I was very disappointed because all he did was complain and act like an idiot. He was really the biggest crybaby I’ve every seen in my life. He was really bad for the game, he really turned me off to the image of what I was coming to see. He was playing a young kid at the time, and he wouldn’t play an old kid, in fact, some boy he was playing in NY ran 40 some off the break and he walked out of the joint and said, ‘People are here to see me play, not you’. I just didn’t really care for his attitude and it really turned me off to pro players at the time. But I still wanted be a great player and go play in the pro tournaments.

Harold Acosta
08-19-2003, 07:34 PM
Nice interview but they could have done better with the names. A lot of misspellings.....

NH_Steve
08-20-2003, 05:45 AM
Although Mosconi was perhaps the very best player ever, he also was the front man for the Brunswick/BCA axis of fantasy that pool should be nothing but a goodie-two-shoes family recreation -- no gambling allowed. It must have really galled and humiliated him to share the TV spotlight with Fats -- who embodied the 'other side' -- the rich gamester tradition that goes back at least to the very first public tables hundreds of years ago.

For that, I partly fault Mosconi.

Why is it that those industry execs don't seem to get it -- the gamester culture in pool is a HUGE part of what supports the game's popularity??? Notice I said popularity -- that popularity would translate into a whole lot more success if the pool industry would simply wake up from their 100+ year 'Music Man' state of mind.

Mosconi, as their goodie-two-shoes front man, is part of the reason pool almost croaked in the 50's -- coincidence? I don't think so. Pool needed Fats a whole lot more than it needed Mosconi, IM (not so) HO...

Now Hopkins comes along and demonstrates the success of his people-oriented show -- outside the sacred umbrella of the BCA -- and guess what? the BCA decides to move their show to potentially conflict with Allen's. -- coincidence? I don't think so...

Hopster
08-20-2003, 10:38 AM
Why is it that those industry execs don't seem to get it -- the gamester culture in pool is a HUGE part of what supports the game's popularity??? Notice I said popularity -- that popularity would translate into a whole lot more success if the pool industry would simply wake up from their 100+ year 'Music Man' state of mind.<--Steve

I like that, Music man state of mind. lol
I really dont know why the hell the pool industry gets bent out of shape by the gambling, i truly dont.
Take golf, they dont say anything about the gambling in golf. Just come out here and go into a sports book and you can get a bet down on almost any big open or make a futures bet on any event. The PGA says nothing at all about this because they are realisitic, they know people are going to bet whether the PGA approves of it or not.
Pool should have woken up years ago and come into the 20th century.

bolo
08-20-2003, 11:14 AM
I don't understand what you are talking about. Pool was all but dead and Brunswick brought it back with the family oriented campaign. They put 20 and 30 table billiard rooms in all their bowling establishments. Well lighted, clean, nice tables, open to and marketed to the family. They took pool from complete obscurity and made it mainstream. I dare say, most of us players in our 50's or so started playing in one of those Brunswick rooms. I am sure I would never have found the game if not for the local bowling ally. I doubt my parents would have dropped me off at "River front" pool room an very seedy place in our town at the time. Mosconi was only one of many players on the Brunswick staff. Balsis, Caras, Wise and many more. They all traveled and did exhibitions for Brunswick. The problems with pool are a lot more complex then it's image, that is the least of it. It is marketing, the principles in the industry today don't seem to know what they are doing, or don't care. We would not be talking on this board and there would be very few places to play even today if it were not for some of the vision of the Brunswick people way back when. By the way, Mosconi was let go by Brunswick many years before he died. I would like to add also, if I had a kid who wanted to learn the game, there is no way I would take him to many of the places I go. The gambling will always be a big part of the pool scene, but the family oriented aspect is a very important also. It is what spawns new players and opens the game to everybody.

JPB
08-20-2003, 01:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Hopster:</font><hr>
I like that, Music man state of mind. lol
I really dont know why the hell the pool industry gets bent out of shape by the gambling, i truly dont.
Take golf, they dont say anything about the gambling in golf. Just come out here and go into a sports book and you can get a bet down on almost any big open or make a futures bet on any event. The PGA says nothing at all about this because they are realisitic, they know people are going to bet whether the PGA approves of it or not.
Pool should have woken up years ago and come into the 20th century.
<hr /></blockquote>

This is not true, and in fact if the PGA had done nothing about gambling you wouldn't be able to bet on it today. Back in the day the PGA Tour was a collection of almost independent tournaments under the general auspices of the PGA of America. The tour pros were looked down upon to some degree, and a lot of gambling went on. Guys made a lot of money on the side. When Bobby Locke came over one guy was the leading money winner by betting on him. I forget who it was, I'd have to go look. And pros would do things that would get them banned forever now, like agreeing to split prize money before a playoff. (Sound familiar.) There were also a lot of problems with calcuttas, but these were not sanctioned by the Tour. I doubt a modern sportsbook would take bets on a sport where collusion went on in playoffs. But the Tour cleaned things up and now is it's own organization. And the USGA will take away amateur status from people who are involved in some gambling activities, although that is not a huge deterrent. (Not betting on their own match, but calcuttas or huge gambling) Anyway, what happened is the money got big and things had to get cleaned up. There was a world of change between 1939 and 1959. WWII Arnold Palmer and TV. Golf benefitted from this, pool and billiards died.