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View Full Version : Points vs. No Points



buddha162
09-10-2003, 09:37 PM
Hello,

I'm thinking about buying a custom cue and my main concern is the hit. I would like a fancy 4-6 point cue with quadruple veneers (who wouldn't?), but my budget is not too forgiving.

I've read that a cue with spliced points is structurally stronger (and more stable, warp-resistent) than one w/o points. Is there any truth to this statement, and if so, how exactly do points reinforce the cue? And is there a discernable difference in hit between pointed cues and plain janes, if the weight, balance, base wood is the same?

Thanks,
Roger

bolo
09-10-2003, 09:57 PM
Your best bet is to go to google.com and click on groups. This has been discussed in great detail with many well known cuemakers coming down on both sides of the controversy. Today many cuemakers such as Scruggs and Bill Stroud do what is called coring. This negates the question, because the cues now whether they have spliced, points, panographed points, or no points at all will have basicly the same properties. If you do a search with the words something like "panographed cue points" or "cnc cue points" " spliced cue points" you will find a lot to keep you busy reading on the subject.

Chris Cass
09-10-2003, 10:51 PM
Hi buddha162,

This is a very controlvercial subject. Some will say the more inlays in a cue will reduce warpage due to, the more wood spices or that it's easier to have one peice of wood warping than a few peices togather.

Another thing is the less cutting the stronger the wood. Shafts warping is much more common than a butt warping due to the amount of time inbetween cuts, while making the shaft.

If your talking the solidness of the hit? Than, I would say a lot has to do with the joint style. A piloted joint perhaps? I'm no authority on the subject but I say. If you take good care in the storing of the cue inbetween use. You'll have no problems. The shafts are another story. You can buy shafts like Dennis Searing or any top name cuemakers that don't mind making a shaft fit. You'll be ok. I would go with a cue that feels right for you. Although, a 6 point cue looks great. I've seen plane janes look beautiful.

JMHO,

C.C.

Fred Agnir
09-11-2003, 06:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote buddha162:</font><hr> Hello,

I'm thinking about buying a custom cue and my main concern is the hit. I would like a fancy 4-6 point cue with quadruple veneers (who wouldn't?), but my budget is not too forgiving.

I've read that a cue with spliced points is structurally stronger (and more stable, warp-resistent) than one w/o points. Is there any truth to this statement, and if so, how exactly do points reinforce the cue? And is there a discernable difference in hit between pointed cues and plain janes, if the weight, balance, base wood is the same?

Thanks,
Roger

<hr /></blockquote>

You'll get good arguments from both sides.

The "points aren't better" side will say that anything you do to cut and re-adhere to a forearm can only increase the fracture points and add unbalanced stress areas.

The "points are better" crowd will say that wood inherently isn't homogenous or particularly stable. Techniques such as lamination (which is cutting and readhering) are proven methods of gaining structural integrity. Radial balancing can be more attainable, as is forearm linear balancing I suppose. Whether or not these have any impact on warp resistance or stability is up for debate.

You know who's got a good opinion on this? Joe Van Buren.

Fred &lt;~~~ and Thomas Wayne

griffith_d
09-11-2003, 10:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote buddha162:</font><hr> Hello,

I'm thinking about buying a custom cue and my main concern is the hit. I would like a fancy 4-6 point cue with quadruple veneers (who wouldn't?), but my budget is not too forgiving.

I've read that a cue with spliced points is structurally stronger (and more stable, warp-resistent) than one w/o points. Is there any truth to this statement, and if so, how exactly do points reinforce the cue? And is there a discernable difference in hit between pointed cues and plain janes, if the weight, balance, base wood is the same?

Thanks,
Roger

<hr /></blockquote>

Since your question touches on two things,...money and function/characteristics of the cue.

For the money, you will not find much difference in the playability whethere you have points are not. Cut in points are only superficial,,..but full spliced would make for contrasting grain in the woods making for a stronger forearm,...making it a "plywood" design.

Get what you can afford. Cues with no points can look very nice,....I want this one bad. So if you buy it, I get to use it every now and then.

http://proficientbilliards.com/store/Samsaracue.htm

Griff

buddha162
09-11-2003, 12:37 PM
I saw several cuemakers coring the butt section. Paul Dayton has a few cored plain janes that look pretty darn good...

Thanks for the reply,
Roger

buddha162
09-11-2003, 12:43 PM
Hello Chris,

I agree that the joint affects the hit more than anything else on the butt section. Currently I use a 3/8-10 with a predator shaft, so I will be keeping the predator with whatever cue I decide to get. The radial pin looks mighty solid.

Thanks,
Roger

buddha162
09-11-2003, 12:48 PM
Hello Griff,

That's a sweet Samsara...If it had a radial pin I'd be drooling.

Half-spliced (v-grooved) points are what I'm talking about, but apparently there is little agreement on the subject. I currently use an old falcon with (I'm sure) cut-in points, and the butt section is slightly warped. Any custom cue I get should be an improvement, though I have no complaints about my cue now.

Roger