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buddha162
09-22-2003, 01:20 AM
I live and play pool in NJ. Is it a bad idea to order custom cues made in Florida (Omen, Dayton), or Arizona (BCM)? If yes, which one is worse: moving a cue from an arid, dry environment to a humid one or vice versa?

Or, does the fact that cues are made indoors with temp/humidity control negate the differences in climate?

Sorry for all the questions, but I don't want to order a cue from across the country and have it warp!

Thank you very much,
Roger

JPB
09-22-2003, 07:31 AM
I don't think this should happen with any quality cue. If the cuemaker uses poor woods or glues it might. So don't get a poor cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

bolo
09-22-2003, 10:00 AM
Your question is not as goofy as some may think. I have been in a lot of cuemakers shops with cues and wood hanging everywhere and the doors open. Many not even with air-conditioning, much less a climate control system. At the very least they should have a separate room where they keep the wood and cues in process. It takes a few days for wood to really make any kind of changes due to moister exchange. So the time the wood is being worked should not matter as long as the wood is stored properly the rest of the time. Finish will not completely stop moisture exchange, even after the cue is completed contrary to what a lot of cuemakers may believe. If the cue is exposed to extremes, things can happen. I would just come out and ask the cuemaker how his wood is stored and see what he says, personally, I would not expect him to be completely honest, but it Can't hurt. Wood gains and loses moisture mostly through the end grain. Ask if he seals the end grain of his shafts and finishes under the wrap. Warps often occur in the wrap area, because it is just raw wood underneath. You sometimes pick up a cue and the wrap area will actually feel wet due to attracting moisture. You also see a lot of shaft collars that fit poorly because the shaft has swelled or shrunk at the joint. There are a lot of details that the cuemaker need to do to assure you a cue that will last for years trouble free. How you treat the cue has a lot to do with it as well.

griffith_d
09-22-2003, 10:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote buddha162:</font><hr> I live and play pool in NJ. Is it a bad idea to order custom cues made in Florida (Omen, Dayton), or Arizona (BCM)? If yes, which one is worse: moving a cue from an arid, dry environment to a humid one or vice versa?

Or, does the fact that cues are made indoors with temp/humidity control negate the differences in climate?

Sorry for all the questions, but I don't want to order a cue from across the country and have it warp!

Thank you very much,
Roger

<hr /></blockquote>

bolo has a good answer about the cuemaker and their facilities. Large cuemaking operations will have seperated areas for drying raw wood, for curing shafts, and creation and assembly areas(spray, lathes, CNC,.. etc). Smaller shops will combine areas and moisture could be a problem.

The cracking/splitting of wood, as bolo said, on the ends is referred to as "checking". If wood is protected by coating(paint, clear coat, etc,..) it, this prevents the splitting from occuring.

I would not worry a great deal about the area you buy a cue from, but more as the quality of cue and how it plays. If it is a good cue, chances are the facilities will be first rate.

Griff

daviddjmp
09-22-2003, 03:00 PM
One solution-

Buy a cue from Mike Capone. He makes great custom cues and is in Mercerville, NJ-

buddha162
09-22-2003, 07:01 PM
Bolo,

Thanks for the info. Of course, if I order a cue from a local maker I can always inspect his shop in person.
[ QUOTE ]
Warps often occur in the wrap area, because it is just raw wood underneath. You sometimes pick up a cue and the wrap area will actually feel wet due to attracting moisture. <hr /></blockquote>
I have an old Falcon that has a warped handle. I'll be getting a wrapless cue, so the entire thing will be finished.

Thanks for replying!
Roger

buddha162
09-22-2003, 07:05 PM
[ QUOTE ]
I would not worry a great deal about the area you buy a cue from, but more as the quality of cue and how it plays. If it is a good cue, chances are the facilities will be first rate.
<hr /></blockquote>

That sounds about right.

Thanks!
Roger

buddha162
09-22-2003, 07:07 PM
[ QUOTE ]
One solution-
Buy a cue from Mike Capone. He makes great custom cues and is in Mercerville, NJ- <hr /></blockquote>
That would be a great solution if only I could afford his cues!

Mike's basic cue starts at $700, and with two predator shafts that's way outside my budget.

He does make beautiful cues though...

Roger

Rich R.
09-23-2003, 04:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote buddha162:</font><hr> That would be a great solution if only I could afford his cues!

Mike's basic cue starts at $700, and with two predator shafts that's way outside my budget.

He does make beautiful cues though...

Roger <hr /></blockquote>
I don't have anything against the others, they are all good, but you should go with a Capone.
I don't think you will get a much better price, from the other cue makers you have mentioned, and you would have personal contact with the cue maker.

griffith_d
09-23-2003, 05:48 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote buddha162:</font><hr> That would be a great solution if only I could afford his cues!

Mike's basic cue starts at $700, and with two predator shafts that's way outside my budget.

He does make beautiful cues though...

Roger <hr /></blockquote>
I don't have anything against the others, they are all good, but you should go with a Capone.
I don't think you will get a much better price, from the other cue makers you have mentioned, and you would have personal contact with the cue maker. <hr /></blockquote>

As of this morning, Caponecues.com is down. But they have other cues by Capone here: http://www.onthehill.net/Capone.htm

Griff