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View Full Version : The book at the Open



phil in sofla
09-25-2003, 02:12 PM
Like Ric or the inspector in Casablanca, I was shocked, shocked to learn that there was gambling going on at the Open (and then the guy hands him an envelope and says, 'your winnings, sir!').

I guess they mainly operated out of the 'players' lounge' area, where the ladder for the tourney was on the wall, but Friday night or Saturday night, they came into the hall, just off the entrance, and passed money around the table.

Not sure how I feel about that. The action is part of the game, and most everybody there would know that to be a fact, not general public types, but pool junkies like most of us here.

It isn't a surprise that there is a line on NFL games, and every sporting event, so in a way, pool is equally entitled.

However, to see it there, I wonder if that's a hidden issue with making pool more generally popular with the public, with its implication, backed by long examples from history, of potential corruption in the matches (aka, dumping).

What says the group? Harmless, expectable, or a black eye for the sport? I'm neutral, pending a better thought out argument than I have.

Popcorn
09-25-2003, 02:31 PM
I love making lines at tournaments. I may bet on almost every match given a chance. It makes it a lot more fun for me. Nothing so terrible about it as long as it is done discretely. Some may disagree, Besides it is not like you are walking around trying to bet with people in the audience, (although I have seen Jim Mataya do that), It is just with a little group of cronies. Don't say anything to the players though. I once told Sigel as he was getting ready to play I had bet a $100. the guy would not get 7 (Race to 11). The match went to hill hill, ( I lost of course) and Sigel pulled it out at the end. He kept looking over at me during the match, I think what I had said may have sharked him a little. I never did that again.

Chris in NC
09-25-2003, 03:22 PM
Wagering is part of the game (particularly at it's higher levels) that no one will ever be able to remove. It is a fact that to get to a very high skill level, one almost has to have played for money - in order to get the opportunity to play with and learn from better players. Wagering on the open for the spectators is no different, and goes on at all the pro tour events, though rarely ever at the wpba events.

I started this post 2 years ago after observing very open wagering at the open. I particularly didn't think it was appropriate that the TD seemed to be involved in the taking of the bets. From what I saw this year, in keeping it for the most part in the other room and having someone else other than the TD handling the money was a major improvement from past years.

I have no problem with it, although you're much better off finding someone else in the crowd to bet so you don't have to pay the 6/5 juice. Also when you bet with the book, if the match falls right on the line, then both sides lose! That's what the book is hoping for. - Chris in NC

Billy
09-26-2003, 01:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> Like Ric or the inspector in Casablanca, I was shocked, shocked to learn that there was gambling going on at the Open (and then the guy hands him an envelope and says, 'your winnings, sir!').

I guess they mainly operated out of the 'players' lounge' area, where the ladder for the tourney was on the wall, but Friday night or Saturday night, they came into the hall, just off the entrance, and passed money around the table.

Not sure how I feel about that. The action is part of the game, and most everybody there would know that to be a fact, not general public types, but pool junkies like most of us here.

It isn't a surprise that there is a line on NFL games, and every sporting event, so in a way, pool is equally entitled.

However, to see it there, I wonder if that's a hidden issue with making pool more generally popular with the public, with its implication, backed by long examples from history, of potential corruption in the matches (aka, dumping).

What says the group? Harmless, expectable, or a black eye for the sport? I'm neutral, pending a better thought out argument than I have.

<hr /></blockquote>

maybe if it were more discreet,I wouldn't mind at all.

similar to occasional calcuttas at smaller pool events,it gives the spectators/players something extra to sweat other than the actual play of the contestants

but considering our sport's usual public perception I tend to think it's best left underground.besides it's not Las Vegas(maybe at Barry's ponderosa /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif) but not in Chesapeake

don't get me wrong,I like to gamble but guess I'm on the 50 yard line?

imo