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JPB
10-04-2003, 10:08 AM
I read the book "On Snooker" by Mordecai Richler. The first few pages got my hopes up. I was thinking it could be a book on sports akin to Fever Pitch, but in the end On Snooker was nowhere near as good as Fever Pitch. Which I suppose is no insult really. (If you have not read Fever Pitch you must. It is one of the great sports books of all time which is amazing given the fact it focuses on soccer.) Anyway, my definition of a great sports book is one that should be read by people with no interest in the sport covered in the book and will be appreciated by them.

On Snooker seems to fail in this regard. I thought the book would give us a really close view of the author's life and tie in his passion for snooker. I think the author tried to do this, but did not quite succeed. I did not feel like I got a close enough look at either snooker or the author. Perhaps I just set my sights too high after the early part of the book. It started out with wonderful writing about the author's introduction to snooker as an observant Jew in Montreal during WWII. A somewhat unusual perspective to say the least. And Richler's talent was obvious in the writing - the writing talent not snooker talent.
Anyway, I think this is a book anybody who likes cue sports should read, whether you like snooker or not. I have never hit a ball on a 12 foot table, my only snooker experience came on 10' American tables playing short rack team matches for low stakes or cheap golf with ball bunting chain smoking old farts. But the book should be read by all cue sport participants. I don't think it will ever have an audience outside those circles. Perhaps I am wrong. But our sport does not generate the volume or quality of writing that baseball or boxing, or other sports for that matter seem to generate, so this book is a good addition to what's out there.

plato 17
10-04-2003, 05:49 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JPB:</font><hr> I read the book "On Snooker" by Mordecai Richler. The first few pages got my hopes up. I was thinking it could be a book on sports akin to Fever Pitch, but in the end On Snooker was nowhere near as good as Fever Pitch. Which I suppose is no insult really. (If you have not read Fever Pitch you must. It is one of the great sports books of all time which is amazing given the fact it focuses on soccer.) Anyway, my definition of a great sports book is one that should be read by people with no interest in the sport covered in the book and will be appreciated by them.

On Snooker seems to fail in this regard. I thought the book would give us a really close view of the author's life and tie in his passion for snooker. I think the author tried to do this, but did not quite succeed. I did not feel like I got a close enough look at either snooker or the author. Perhaps I just set my sights too high after the early part of the book. It started out with wonderful writing about the author's introduction to snooker as an observant Jew in Montreal during WWII. A somewhat unusual perspective to say the least. And Richler's talent was obvious in the writing - the writing talent not snooker talent.
Anyway, I think this is a book anybody who likes cue sports should read, whether you like snooker or not. I have never hit a ball on a 12 foot table, my only snooker experience came on 10' American tables playing short rack team matches for low stakes or cheap golf with ball bunting chain smoking old farts. But the book should be read by all cue sport participants. I don't think it will ever have an audience outside those circles. Perhaps I am wrong. But our sport does not generate the volume or quality of writing that baseball or boxing, or other sports for that matter seem to generate, so this book is a good addition to what's out there. <hr /></blockquote>


This is a pool board, these are pool players, put your snooker books on a snooker board where somebody might be interested. Snooker is played about as much in the us now as rotation or cribbage is, it's now a dead game. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

JPB
10-04-2003, 06:19 PM
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This is a pool board, these are pool players, put your snooker books on a snooker board where somebody might be interested. Snooker is played about as much in the us now as rotation or cribbage is, it's now a dead game. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif <hr /></blockquote>


I hope you are joking. If you are and I missed it, sorry. If you are not, shut up, you sound like an idiot.