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View Full Version : Wrap Question-Is more friction better?



Wally_in_Cincy
04-13-2002, 09:57 AM
Sorry, yet another wrap thread.

I prefer to hold the cue very loosely, basically lying on the fingers, for most shots. The linen wrap on my Lucasi, for some reason, has more friction than most linen wraps. I find it easier to shoot with that cue due to the added friction. It seems to minimize the necessity of gripping the cue tight. So if one would extrapolate this theory, would not even more friction be desirable? Perhaps suede?

Scratching my head again.....

Tom_In_Cincy
04-13-2002, 10:07 AM
Is the friction felt while you are striking the cue ball or when you are stroking?

If it is felt while striking the cue ball, I would assume that you are feeling the resistance of the hit.

If it is felt while stroking, this is just good feedback on your stroke.. which is a good thing..

Either way, if it helps your game, confidence and accuracy wise, keep it up.. I doubt any more friction would help, what is already a good feedback mechanism.

TonyM
04-13-2002, 02:36 PM
That's an interesting question. First-off, suede is probably a bad choice (I've tried it). The surface actually creates less friction, not more, so you end up gripping the cue firmly so that it doesn't fly across the room! Smooth or textured leather is a better option. 3C billiard players use a rubber wrap for just the reasons that you outlined. They prefer a very light grip on the cue (usually with the finger tips) so they need a wrap with high friction.

Now Snooker players tend to have a somewhat firmer grip (for accuracy) with the cue pulled up into the web formed between the thumb and forefinger. The cue then pivots about this "v" with the other fingers merely supporting (not actually gripping) the cue. I found that with a rubber wrap, the Snooker grip is not appropriate, since the sticky surface prevents the thumb and forefinger from pivoting freely. Perhaps that it why Snooker players prefer a cue with a bare wooden handle? (no-wrap).

Keep in mind that the non absorbent type of wraps (like leather and rubber) are better suited to players with relatively dry hands. Rubber gets very sticky if your hands sweat a lot, and leather can get slippery.

A good compromise is a textured leather wrap. The reduced surface are helps keep the surface friction near constant even if your hand sweats.

Good luck.

Tony

clarence
04-13-2002, 05:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: TonyM:</font><hr>
Keep in mind that the non absorbent type of wraps (like leather and rubber) are better suited to players with relatively dry hands. Rubber gets very sticky if your hands sweat a lot, and leather can get slippery.

A good compromise is a textured leather wrap. The reduced surface are helps keep the surface friction near constant even if your hand sweats.

Good luck.

Tony <hr></blockquote>

Is textured leather wrap the same as just leather wraps ? most production cues that offer leather wrap just provide the option of irish linen, no wrap or leather wrap (no mention what kind ) . How do we know its textured leather or not and from what animal shold this leather come from ?

I grip with 2 fingers , thumb and forefinger, even on the break shot. The cue is not pulled up into the web area skin between thum and forefinger but is cradled in the upper half of the fingers (from the nail down 1/2 of the finger lenght). This way, even as a draw the cue back on the backswing, the cue stay a bit more level than if I grip the cue in the web area of thumb and forefinger. Specially for those who use a long backswing this more levelness of the cue in the backstroke is more evident with the finger tip grip such as the one i use

TonyM
04-14-2002, 12:04 AM
Texture refers to the type of surface on the wrap. A smooth wrap is just that, smooth. A textured wrap is embossed with a pattern (like a faux snake skin for example) or might even be made from an exotic skin. Many wraps are now made from embossed pig skin.

Regarding your grip, you can get the same cue levelling benefits even if the cue is pulled up into the finger web. You can see this on Frank Callan's Snooker web site. On the back swing, the remaining fingers come away from the cue (leaving only the thumb and forefinger). This helps to keep the cue level.

Tony

Rod
04-14-2002, 01:50 AM
Quote"Regarding your grip, you can get the same cue levelling benefits even if the cue is pulled up into the finger web. You can see this on Frank Callan's Snooker web site. On the back swing, the remaining fingers come away from the cue (leaving only the thumb and forefinger). This helps to keep the cue level.

Yes it does Tony, and very similar to the way I play. The other fingers go along for the ride per-say.