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View Full Version : Temperature and table storage?



Godzilla
10-26-2003, 02:29 PM
Hi, I'm in the final stages of choosing a table to purchase for my home. It is between a Diamond Pro and Gabriels Signature Pro now but my question is this. The Gabriels table has been sitting in a warehouse in Las Vegas and I am wondering what would happen to the tables being exposed to the temperature/humid conditions there? Does anyone know if this is something I should be worrying about?
Thanks, /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gifGodzilla /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

ras314
10-26-2003, 03:11 PM
I have the same question. Would a Gabriel with the steel slate support be less sensitive than others?

logixrat
10-26-2003, 04:29 PM
Not an expert by any means, but it seems that the steel beam would hold up better as long as it was painted/treated so it did not rust with moisture build up.

SPetty
10-27-2003, 12:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Godzilla:</font><hr> The Gabriels table has been sitting in a warehouse in Las Vegas and I am wondering what would happen to the tables being exposed to the temperature/humid conditions there? <hr /></blockquote>Are you assuming that the warehouse is not climate controlled, or were you told that? (Many warehouses are climate controlled...)

I tend to think the humidity in Las Vegas wouldn't be troublesome... /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

CRATER59
10-27-2003, 02:16 PM
Greetings,
I have worked extensively with museums and art collectors developing climate controlled storage environments. The main factor that affects materials, be they wood, metal, fabric, canvas, rubber, slate, or what have you, is humidity. To control any adversity effected by humidity change, crated objects are brought into a climate controlled space (70 deg. F / 50 % Relative Humidity) and left in their crates for a period of at least 72hrs before being unpacked. By leaving the objects in their crates, the materials are given time to either dry out or soak up humidity at a slow rate. It is when materials undergo a sudden rise or drop in humidity that warpage and delamination occur. Incidentally even metal size can be affected by humidity changes.
In the case of having a table shipped from Vegas to Canada, I would recommend having the seller wrap the pieces with furniture paper and cardboard box them. Upon their arrival, I would place the boxes in the room where they will ultimately be assembled. Allow them to sit un opened in the room for at least 1 week. This will allow all the pieces to climatize at a slow even rate. After 1 week put your table together and fire away.
And just a note to all table owners, it is just as important to add humidity to your playing room with a good quality humidifier in the cold dry winter as it is to keep the room cool and dry in the hot wet summer. Keeping the conditions constant is the key to maintaining a level unwarped slate bed. I have often gone into a poolroom in the winter and the heat is blasting, the air is dry as cotton, and and the wax or plaster slate seams on the tables are sticking up like ridges. This is caused by the lack of moisture in the air. Of course, humidity is affected by temperature but it can be controlled easily, but I have never been in a poolroom that had any kind of humidification system.
I hope this info is helpful. Good luck.

Cueless Joey
10-27-2003, 04:54 PM
Hmn, I wonder if the glue on the rubber cushions held up.
Paging Joe Marra, paging Joe...