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View Full Version : Standard length cues and short people.



bluewolf
11-02-2003, 05:25 AM
My step daughter age 11 likes pool. She actually has a pretty, natural stroke, bridge etc and is developing into a good shooter considering her age and how long she has played. We think she may have some talent. Good eye-hand coordination like her daddy. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

When we bought her first cue, it was a cheap one. All we could find at the time in a very cheap cue (not knowing if she was going to stick with it) was a 19 oz and too back weighted.

Now a friend is sending me a nicer one. (it is purple, which she likes /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif) It is an older falcon, 17oz and more mid weighted. It is a little longer, standard length. The question I have, (since I did not play much when I was short) is at 5ft or 5ft one inch tall, will this be too long for her? Anyone had experience with this with shorter people and cue length?

Laura

Sid_Vicious
11-02-2003, 09:22 AM
BW...You asked a question I needed an answer to. I am working with a 12 year old and about half way through the first session it came to my attention(complaining about it being too heavy) that my standard cues were too long. Believe it or not we used my jump cue, reduculously hard tip and all, and had instant progress. I remembered that I had inherited a "shorty" cue when I bought my home table, the cue residing back in the pit I call my guest bedroom closet. It worked better, but I still need to know more about getting an actual, nice looking new cue some day in the proper dimensions....sid

Carlton31698
11-02-2003, 11:04 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif When I first started playing pool (about 11 or 12 years ago) the room owners son was 5 or 6 years old, he was playing with a full length cue on a 9 foot table. He had a milk crate tied to his shoe string so he could drag it around and stand on it to shoot. I asked the kidís dad why he wasnít using a shorter cue he gave me three reasons
1 A 6 foot tall person has shots on a 9 foot table he or she cannot reach, if a shorter person uses a short cue think about how many more shots they will not be able to reach.
2 He also felt that it would be better for his son to grow into his cue rather than having to change cues as he got taller.
3 If he took his son somewhere to play and they forgot his cue he could play with another without having to deal with a huge change in length

It worked out well for the kid he is 17 and still playing with the same cue. He plays lights out too.
He placed 3rd in the 18 and under Junior Nationals this year.

I would say use a regular lenght cue. Carlton
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dg-in-centralpa
11-02-2003, 11:27 AM
Laura - check out Stealth Cues. They make decent cues for shorter people. They are well balanced and come with a case. I got one for my daughter and it is 48" rather than the 57" or 58" that is normal. She couldn't hold a regular stick 'cause of being too small. This did the trick. I think the cue cost between $50 and $75. Well worth the money.

DG - Good Luck

ras314
11-02-2003, 11:28 AM
Sid...Quite likely the balance point is too far to the rear rather than the cue being too heavy. Having a short wing span and choking up on the handle will make it feel heavy. Also may force the habit of gripping the cue tightly in order to keep the shaft down on the bridge.

The other thing that could be an issue is the table being too high. Apt to develop a drastic side stroke.

Sid_Vicious
11-02-2003, 11:33 AM
The heighth may be an issue and yet the side arm stroke is not near as prevalent when we use the jump cue as a play cue, so I'm wondering if the heighth is really the issue at all. I suppose I need to find something to elevate her to the table just to be sure,,,what's that gonna be? Time to think that over. Thanks...sid

ras314
11-02-2003, 12:11 PM
If she is standing on tippy toes the table is too high. I remember doing that at about 9 or 10.

Far as not being able to reach shots further out on the table, why not teach the use of the crutch when she's a little farther along. Something I still haven't learned.

BTW, meant balance point too far to rear. If held at or in front of the balance it's going to feel pretty weird. I have seen a good money player shoot that way and with a long bridge. Danged if I know how he does it.

Jay
11-02-2003, 12:30 PM
Hey bluewolf look for an ad in the new billiards digest. There is a company that makes cues that are specifically designed for children. I dont rememer the company but I Just remember the add. They are balanced so that they dont dig with the cue which is caused by the heavy back weight of a standard cue. I know its vague but I hope it helps

Sid_Vicious
11-02-2003, 12:45 PM
I actually had her foundation fixed very first thing, so tip toes aren't an issue, I've never seen that tendency as of yet anyway. Whether she is sidewinding to adjust to the new foundation is another question though.

I did get into the bridge last week and it'll be ok, not a real difficulty as of yet, but it's still just a beginning. The bridge wouldn't be on the agenda yet but we finished the day playing some 9-ball and I felt it was a definite disadvantage by not bringing the bridge out when there was a stretch involved rather than poking the cue out with a 2 foot bridge length. It worked out ok, I was happy. It'll be slow but we'll get there as long as the drill work doesn't kill the interest. We haven't started that yet...sid

bluewolf
11-02-2003, 02:54 PM
Thanks to all.

Even though she is 5 ft, she looks like she will be quite a bit taller in a year or two based on heights of family and how fast she is growing.OK correction, ww thinks she may be 5 two. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

When she first picked up the cue, she had a decent stance and ok, though not great stroke. We taught her a bridge since she was having trouble more with that.The next time she played at our house, she had a very good bridge and a good stroke, not perfect but straight. The only thing that is a little atypical is that her wrist is cocked inward somewhat. I do not know what happened to her in that month, if she figured things out for herself or what.

I just wondered about the cue length because I have heard of shorter women here who prefer shorter cues. She can hold just about any cue we have but has already decided she does not like her backweighted one but wants one that is more forward in balance like blackheart and some others make their cues.Since she seems to have some natural ability, just want to be sure. It is so fun to have a kid that shows some talent. Makes a parent kind of have those gushy mushy good feelings. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Laura

tateuts
11-02-2003, 11:42 PM
My daughter is only 8 but she's already 4'6" and has had 3 cues already. She has a very nice stroke and can make good shots, but she has a limited interest in pool since she has so many other activities.

I cut down some house cues for her - just cut off the butt. Then I bought her a 52" Robin Dodson "Frog" jump cue on E-Bay for about $50. These are good for kids, they're light and the kids like the little frog stickers on them.Then I just put on a regular tip, and she has a pretty nice little two piece.

Chris

bluewolf
11-03-2003, 05:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tateuts:</font><hr> My daughter is only 8 but she's already 4'6" and has had 3 cues already. She has a very nice stroke and can make good shots, but she has a limited interest in pool since she has so many other activities.

Chris
<hr /></blockquote>

That interest thing in young girls. This is my plan that I told ww. Play pool for 20 minutes or so, then go shopping, let her bring a friend too, whatever it takes. As long as she keeps playing, once she gets better, think nothing succeeds like success. GEEZ, just telling her we got this new cue because she is so talented and the person who sent it to me wanted a talented young person to use it will go to her head big time. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Ours has lots of other girly interests too so will be trying to work around her busy social schedule as much as possible. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

It is interesting how praise, encouragement and rewards work so well with these kids. She and I played in our condo pool, swam, with me teaching LOL, told her how talented she was, kept playing and swimming and pumping up her confidence. Boom, next summer she was on the swim team.

Laura

SRpool
11-03-2003, 05:37 AM
Hey BW,

She definitely needs to use a regular length cue, maybe 18 to 18.5oz. If she uses the regular length cue it will be one less thing to adjust to when she grows. Plus, if she is 5' tall she is already a little taller or as tall as about 8 of the women on the pro tour...including me. I started when I was 10 and I was very short. I had to use a stool but always used a regular length cue. My side arm problem adjust more quickly plus I could learn a little about having to stretch for shots. I think she should learn how to use the bridge or play opposite handed early. I was never taught to use the bridge so I taught myself how to shoot left handed. To this day I cannot rely on the bridge /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif Take care.

Sarah Rousey

Fred Agnir
11-03-2003, 09:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr>
Now a friend is sending me a nicer one. (it is purple, which she likes /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif) It is an older falcon, 17oz and more mid weighted. It is a little longer, standard length. The question I have, (since I did not play much when I was short) is at 5ft or 5ft one inch tall, will this be too long for her? Anyone had experience with this with shorter people and cue length?

Laura <hr /></blockquote> It all depends on how comfortable she is with it. 58" length is not too long in of itself.

Someone mentioned the Stealth line of children cues that are shorter for short people. I believe the longest of these is 52", which I think is too short for someone who stands 5' 2". I have one for my younger daughter who stands 4' 9". IMO, it's too short for her. However, the 58" cues are a little big. Maybe a lighter (16-17 oz) 57" model would do.

Fred

Scott Lee
11-03-2003, 09:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SRpool:</font><hr> I was never taught to use the bridge so I taught myself how to shoot left handed. To this day I cannot rely on the bridge /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif Take care.

Sarah Rousey <hr /></blockquote>

Sarah...That is untrue! All three of us (Mark Wilson, Jerry Briesath, and myself) taught you the basics of how and when to use the bridge, when you were at the BCA Kids Camp all three summers. Of course, this was when you were 10-12, and you didn't want to PRACTICE using the bridge (remember Cody Simko?...he didn't like to use the bridge either!). That's why you're still not comfortable with it now. That's okay, but you WERE shown how! BTW, there is something to be said for learning to shoot off-handed, as well! For anyone wanting to become proficient at using a mechanical bridge...play whole games with the bridge!

Scott Lee

Scott Lee
11-03-2003, 10:00 AM
I agree with you Carlton. I have been to several Jr. National tournaments, with youngsters of all ages and sizes, and NONE of them played with a shorter cue! The shorter cues have their place, but my suggestion would be to learn with a lightweight, normal length cue, if you are serious about keeping up with the game.

Scott Lee

SRpool
11-03-2003, 05:29 PM
Scott,

There is some truth to the fact that I did learn how to use the bridge. I think what I meant was that it is very uncomfortable to use the bridge because I can't figure out a comfortable way to stand. So, I know how to use the bridge but it is uncomfortable because it is something I haven't practiced as much because I learned to play opposite handed. I am not so stubborn to learn anymore.

sarah

daviddjmp
11-03-2003, 06:13 PM
It's interesting-

Pat Fleming is a full grown adult and plays with a 53" cue (at least hed did a number of years back. He used a regular 58" for long shots, but he says he is most comfortable with the shorter cue. I saw a video where he runs over a hundred balls shooting with this really short cue.To each his own-

Scott Lee
11-03-2003, 10:04 PM
Sarah...Well SEE? There ya go! Now you can choose to practice with it some more, if you want to (I'd be more than willing to help you figure out a more comfortable stance, if you like). But if your stroke developes as well with your one hand as it is already with your other, you will likely rarely need to use a bridge! Either way, I wish you good luck on the tour. Kick some butt!

Scott

Fred Agnir
11-03-2003, 10:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote daviddjmp:</font><hr> It's interesting-

Pat Fleming is a full grown adult and plays with a 53" cue (at least hed did a number of years back. He used a regular 58" for long shots, but he says he is most comfortable with the shorter cue. I saw a video where he runs over a hundred balls shooting with this really short cue.To each his own- <hr /></blockquote> Earl has also switched to a shorter cue. I believe he said 54".

He also has a "jump cue." But, it's much longer than a "normal" jump cue. Over 50" for sure. In his hands, full ball jumps pocketing a ball 8' away and drawing straight back 9' are about 75%.

Fred &lt;~~~ friggin' sickening

cycopath
11-04-2003, 11:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote daviddjmp:</font><hr> It's interesting-

Pat Fleming is a full grown adult and plays with a 53" cue (at least hed did a number of years back. He used a regular 58" for long shots, but he says he is most comfortable with the shorter cue. I saw a video where he runs over a hundred balls shooting with this really short cue.To each his own- <hr /></blockquote>

I've got that Accu-Stats video. It's him and Grady playing. And it's also a player review tape so you hear them commenting about the shots. When Pat tells Grady that the cue he was shooting with is 53" Grady goes off, saying something like, "Have you lost all mental reasoning?". It's pretty funny.