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Thread: what to look for in a cue?

  1. #1
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    what to look for in a cue?

    ive played pool for just kicks and giggles over the years. for the past month i have been playin at all the different pool halls and really want to get into it. but i want a cue of my own to start with. what do i look for in a cue? i jus want something basic. but really, how can i tel if it hits straight? if the cue is straight? fiberglass or wood? disadvantage and advantages?

  2. #2
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    Re: what to look for in a cue?

    Ill tell you like this.
    the more expensive the better. But with that said even the low end cues are fine as long as your comfortable. The man behind the Cue is what counts.

    the advantage of having your own cue in my opinion is that you know its capabilities and are comfortable with how it plays knocking balls into pockets.

    here is a geat for instance, I bought a Crest, 2 piece cue for breakshots. It's around 20 bucks, the first time I made a break with it, I thought to myself "this thing is crap im better off with a house stick" but after a couple of weeks I became comfortable with it and how it reacted when hitting the cue ball. As a result sometimes I forget its even in my hand after the break and continue to sink balls with it afterwards.

    My main cue is a Action Cue, and Im saving up for a Joss or
    a Viking or a Meccuci. Why? cause I bought a bag that holds 6 cues *smile*. Does my action cue play different from the Crest Cue? yes. Will either the viking, joss, or Meccuci play different than the action cue? yes, each has a different feel. If your comfortable with playing with a broomstick you could theoretically sink balls( though putting english on the cueball may be a bit more difficult with a Broomstick *smile*)
    one could even argue that each cue has different accuracy than the other, and I might agree, but we are human beings and even the most accurate cue in the world wont improve your game if your off on your aim or use the wrong english or plain hit the Cueball in the wrong spot.

    the only way to tell if a cue is straight with the naked eye is roll it accross the table and see if it wobbles.
    if it doesnt, then Its straight enough to hit the ball correctly generally speaking.

    Just my humble opinion im sure others have thiers.
    Manta01


    <blockquote><font class="small">Quote HITMANJUICE:</font><hr> ive played pool for just kicks and giggles over the years. for the past month i have been playin at all the different pool halls and really want to get into it. but i want a cue of my own to start with. what do i look for in a cue? i jus want something basic. but really, how can i tel if it hits straight? if the cue is straight? fiberglass or wood? disadvantage and advantages? <hr /></blockquote>

  3. #3
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    Re: what to look for in a cue?

    HEY THANKS FOR THE INFO

  4. #4
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    Raleigh, N.C.
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    Re: what to look for in a cue?

    Hey bro, I dont know a whole lot about cues, but I did search several of them when I was buying mine. I agree with yall that more expensive is better, but sometimes it is not true. Alot of the money you spend it due to the inlays and design in it. My cue has a decent amount of inlay but will probably play just as good as the same kind of cue with just graphics. The more extravagent looking the more it will be. Just my two cents. Yall do have a point though because a Schon or McDermitt will be more than my Fury and Im sure is a better cue, so it all depends, hope this helps a little.
    Kendall

  5. #5
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    Re: what to look for in a cue?

    hmm......i would have to agree that with higher price comes a better cue, but until you are absolutely positive that pool is going to be something you will stick with forever, dont go investing in a cue that leaves you with one less limb, if ya get my drift. my current cues are 2 players (one basic 20 OZ and a specialty cue with the extension due to my lack of height.) but my shooting cue is a McDermott that i acquired from a friend. it is probably close to 25 years old, has a #10 shaft, which took some adjusting to, and shoots straighter than any cue i have ever posessed.

    get what you feel comfortable with, but dont be too extravagant just yet.
    If it ain't broke, fix it till it is!

  6. #6
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    Re: what to look for in a cue?

    Hey ive been playing for about 3 months and ive learned a few things. You really have to go and try the cues and not just for a few balls but like an hour.. Go to places like the billiard factory who let you play with the cues, It helps alot. In all my trial and error ive learned that i like a med hitting cue.. maybe a stainless steel joint on one side and a phelonic on the shaft... As for decent cue makers i just bought a pechauer jpo6 and the fit and finish is beautiful. Way better than the mcdermott i sent back. Anyway you have to try them out!
    Ill make one up later

  7. #7
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    Re: what to look for in a cue?

    You can Go out and buy a cue for $50 or even $9,800.
    It's not Price that makes the player, though it helps [img]/ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img].
    I am 16 years old and I have used all types of cues, custom and production and still I can shoot just aswell with the $5 Broom-Stick as I can with the SouthWest custom(1500+). Although I shoot With a Joss, it's still a great thing to learn to use what you can pick-up. As long as it's comfy.

    I went to Homedepot and bought a wooden broom handle, I went home; Drilled a pilot hole for a furrel with a moori tip(I spent the most on that than anything else)and basicly put it together. For shits and grins I play with that every other blue moon.
    Moori CueTip: $14.95
    Broom-Stick: $5.00
    Furrel: $2.95
    The look on you opponents face.... Priceless
    For everything else there's Mastercard.
    -Vinnie

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