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Thread: Paul Begala: Today’s Republican Party is ‘Neanderthals fighting with Cro-Magnons’

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    Paul Begala: Today’s Republican Party is ‘Neanderthals fighting with Cro-Magnons’

    Paul Begala: Today’s Republican Party is ‘Neanderthals fighting with Cro-Magnons’

    By David Edwards
    Sunday, July 28, 2013 11:19 EDT
    RawStory.com
    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/07/2...h-cro-magnons/




    Democratic strategist Paul Begala on Sunday asserted that infighting between different factions of Republicans appeared just to be “Neanderthals fighting with Cro-Magnons” as the party lunged further and further to the right.

    During a panel discussion on CNN, Democratic Pollster Cornell Belcher said that internal arguments about policies like National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance showed that Republicans were having difficulty reacting to social change in America.

    “Unfortunately for us in Congress right now, you have this civil war unfolding in Congress and it’s making Congress completely dysfunctional,” Belcher explained. “America, your Congress does not work because of this civil war that’s going on.”

    Begala added that the civil war also wasn’t working for the Republican Party politically.

    “I checked, party identification — the percentage of Americans who call themselves Republicans — all-time low, lower than Watergate, only 21 percent say that they’re Republicans today,” Begala noted. “That’s a catastrophe.”

    “Republicans have become more ideologically conservative, they’ve moved farther from the mainstream, and they’re more fractured,” he continued. “Usually when you become more extreme — more left in my party, more right in the Republicans’ — you at least get some cohesion. Here you have a much more conservative party than 20 years ago and a much more fractured party.”

    “The Neanderthals are fighting with Cro-Magnons, the neoliths hate the paleoliths. It’s great. I love it as a Democrat.”

    Watch the video from CNN’s State of the Union, broadcast July 28, 2013 at the link: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/07/2...h-cro-magnons/




  2. #2
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    I doubt that a kathlick knows much about Neanderthals.
    I will get my science somewhere else.
    mac.
    Last edited by cushioncrawler; 07-29-2013 at 05:58 AM.

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    WIKILEAKS.
    Cro-Magnon (i/kroʊˈmænjən/ or US pronunciation: /kroʊˈmæɡnən/; French: [kʁomaɲɔ̃]) is a name that has been used to describe the first early modern humans (early Homo sapiens sapiens) of the European Upper Paleolithic.[1] Current scientific literature prefers the term European Early Modern Humans (EEMH), to the term 'Cro-Magnon' which has no formal taxonomic status, as it refers neither to a species or subspecies nor to an archaeological phase or culture.[1] The earliest known remains of Cro-Magnon-like humans are radiocarbon dated to 43,000 years before present.[2]

    Cro-Magnons were robustly built and powerful. The body was generally heavy and solid with a strong musculature. The forehead was fairly straight rather than sloping like in Neanderthals, and with only slight browridges. The face was short and wide. Like other modern humans, Cro-Magnons had a prominent chin. The brain capacity was about 1,600 cubic centimetres (98 cu in), larger than the average for modern humans.[3] However recent research suggests that the physical dimensions of so-called "Cro-Magnon" are not sufficiently different from modern humans to warrant a separate designation.[4][5]

    Etymology[edit]
    The name derives from the Abri de Cro-Magnon (French: rock shelter of Cro-Magnon, the big cave in Occitan) near the commune of Les Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil in southwestern France, where the first specimen was found.[6] Being the oldest known modern humans (Homo sapiens sapiens) in Europe, the Cro-Magnons were from the outset linked to the well-known Lascaux cave paintings and the Aurignacian culture whose remains were well known from southern France and Germany. As additional remains of early modern humans were discovered in archaeological sites from Western Europe and elsewhere, and dating techniques improved in the early 20th century, new finds were added to the taxonomic classification.
    Forensic facial reconstruction of a Cro-Magnon man
    The term "Cro-Magnon" soon came to be used in a general sense to describe the oldest modern people in Europe. By the 1970s the term was used for any early modern human wherever found, as was the case with the far-flung Jebel Qafzeh remains in Israel and various Paleo-Indians in the Americas.[7] However, analyses based on more current data[8] concerning the migrations of early humans have contributed to a refined definition of this expression. Today, the term "Cro-Magnon" falls outside the usual naming conventions for early humans, though it remains an important term within the archaeological community as an identifier for the commensurate fossil remains in Europe and adjacent areas.[1] Current scientific literature prefers the term "European Early Modern Humans" (or EEMH), instead of "Cro-Magnon". The oldest definitely dated EEMH specimen is the Grotta del Cavallo tooth dated in 2011 to at least 43,000 years old.[2]

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    Neanderthal
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Neanderthal Temporal range: Middle to Late Pleistocene 0.6–0.03Ma Phylum:ChordataClass:MammaliaOrder:PrimatesFamily: HominidaeGenus:HomoSpecies:H. neanderthalensis
    Binomial nameHomo neanderthalensis King, 1864
    Range of Homo neanderthalensis. Eastern and northern ranges may extend to include Okladnikov in Altai and Mamotnaia in Ural
    The Neanderthals or Neandertals (/niˈændərˌθɔːlz/, /niˈændərˌtɔːlz/, /niˈændərˌtɑːlz/, /neɪˈɑːndərˌtɑːlz/ or /niˈændərθəlz/)[1] are an extinct species or subspecies of the genus Homo which is closely related to modern humans.[2][3] They are known from fossils, dating from the Pleistocene period, which have been found in Europe and parts of western and central Asia. The species is named after Neandertal ("Neander's Valley"), the location in Germany where it was first discovered.

    Neanderthals are classified either as a subspecies of Homo sapiens (Homo sapiens neanderthalensis) or as a separate species of the same genus (Homo neanderthalensis).[4] The first humans with proto-Neanderthal traits are believed to have existed in Europe as early as 600,000–350,000 years ago.[5]

    When the Neanderthals went extinct is disputed. Fossils found in the Vindija Cave in Croatia have been dated to between 33,000 and 32,000 years old, and Neanderthal artefacts from Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar are believed to be less than 30,000 years ago, but a recent study has re-dated fossils at two Spanish sites as 45,000 years old, 10,000 years older than previously thought, and may cast doubt on recent dates at other sites. Cro-Magnon (early-modern-human) skeletal remains showing certain "Neanderthal traits" have been found in Lagar Velho (Portugal) and dated to 24,500 years ago, suggesting that there may have been an extensive admixture of the Cro-Magnon and Neanderthal populations in that region.[6]

    Several cultural assemblages have been linked to the Neanderthals in Europe. The earliest, the Mousterian stone tool culture, dates to about 300,000 years ago.[7] Late Mousterian artifacts were found in Gorham's Cave on the south-facing coast of Gibraltar.[8][9] Other tool cultures associated with the Neanderthals include the Châtelperronian, the Aurignacian, and the Gravettian; their tool assemblages appear to have developed gradually within their populations, rather than being introduced by new population groups arriving in the region.[10]

    Neanderthal cranial capacity is thought to have been as large as that of modern humans, perhaps larger, indicating that their brain size may have been comparable, or larger, as well. In 2008, a group of scientists created a study using three-dimensional computer-assisted reconstructions of Neanderthal infants based on fossils found in Russia and Syria. The study showed Neanderthal and modern human brains were the same size at birth, but by adulthood, the Neanderthal brain was larger than the modern human brain.[11] They were much stronger than modern humans, having particularly strong arms and hands.[12] Males stood 164–168 cm (65–66 in) and females about 152–156 cm (60–61 in) tall.[13]

    Genetic evidence published in 2010 suggests that Neanderthals contributed to the DNA of anatomically modern humans, probably through interbreeding between 80,000 and 50,000 years ago with the population of anatomically modern humans who had recently migrated from Africa. According to the study, by the time that population began dispersing across Eurasia, Neanderthals genes constituted as much as 1–4% of its genome.[14][15][16]
    Name[edit]

    The species is named after the site of its first discovery, about 12 km (7.5 mi) east of Düsseldorf, Germany, in the Feldhofer Cave in the river Düssel's Neander valley named for Joachim Neander, a 17th-century German pastor and hymnist. Neander's own name was in turn a Greek translation of the German Neumann (lit. "New man"). Thal is the older spelling of Tal (both with the same pronunciation), the German word for 'valley' (cognate with English dale).[17][18][19]

    Neanderthal 1 was known as the "Neanderthal skull" or "Neanderthal cranium" in anthropological literature, and the individual reconstructed on the basis of the skull was occasionally called "the Neanderthal man".[20] The binomial name Homo neanderthalensis – extending the name "Neanderthal man" from the individual type specimen to the entire species – was first proposed by the Anglo-Irish geologist William King in 1864 and this had priority over the proposal put forward in 1866 by Ernst Haeckel, Homo stupidus.[18] The practice of referring to "the Neanderthals" and "a Neanderthal" emerged in the popular literature of the 1920s.[21]

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    The Neanderthals are fighting with Cro-Magnons, the neoliths hate the paleoliths. It’s great. I love it as a Democrat.”

    In the future (if) man will look back at theusofa (and all) az the worst thing to happen. Theze are the dark ages. Future eaters. Superstitious ignorant selfish pinkarsed apes.
    Neoliths were ok. Paleoliths were ok. Godoliths are the problem.

    God bless guns.
    God bless gangs.
    God bless gridlock.
    God bless america.
    mac.
    Last edited by cushioncrawler; 07-30-2013 at 06:41 PM.

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