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Thread: The THE SHNOLL EFFEKT.

  1. #1
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    The THE SHNOLL EFFEKT.

    Not generally known, billiards performance, indeed everything, iz affekted by the The Shnoll Effekt.
    The The Shnoll Effekt mainly affekts "background noize", ie the suppozedly random spreads of rezults.

    Cahill (works in Adelaide) haz shown that the The Shnoll Effekt haz (had) a speed of 528kmph (where did I get this -- 500km/s iz truer). This woz based mainly on tests carryd out in Perth, komparing theze to the same tests (on the same days) in London. Cahill claims that the The Shnoll Effekt iz linked to gravity-waves, partikularly gravity-turbulence.

    Whereaz the The Shnoll Effekt iz related to aether-physics, it nunntheless affekts large-scale things like earthquakes, and even social-scale things like sports performance (eg billiards).

    Hencely having a good runout might depend on time of (sidereal) day. And the randomness of rezult(s) iz (woz) linked to the meridian (allbeit a leaning 81dg -- 83dg meridian), in partikular separated by a time based on 528kmph (shood be 500km/s ??????) (depending on date) measured along the line to-from heaven (allowing for the speed and rotation and spin of the milkyway and the sun and earth)(ie a sidereal aether thing). The The Shnoll Effekt takes (took) 5.3hours to travel from London to Perth (or iz it vice-versa, Perth to London, not sure).

    Anyhow, better luck next time.
    mac.
    I woz in Adelaide last week, i shood hav challenged Cahill to a game of billiards, He iz my all-time No1 fizzix-hero.
    Dayton Millar and Michelson and Morley are No's 2 3 4. And No5 Shnoll, i might challenge Him to Russian Billiards if ever i go to Russia. No6 Mathis. No7 Ranzan.
    Last edited by cushioncrawler; 04-01-2014 at 11:21 PM.

  2. #2
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    A Simple Experiment
    We now give a very brief description of the basic phenomenon discovered by Shnoll and his collaborators. The phenomenon itself is so astonishingly simple, that it is amazing that it has not attracted more attention until now.
    The simplest case is the measurement of radioactive decay, where Shnoll has conducted thousands of experiments of the following simple type. We take a radioactive sample, and place it in front of a suitable detector (such as a Geiger counter), which counts the individual acts of radioactive decay of nuclei in the sample by detecting the emitted particles. Assuming the half-life of the radioactive element involved is relatively long, the count-rate of the detector, in counts per second or per minute, will fluctuate around a certain average value, which is related to the number of radioactive atoms in the sample and their half-life.

    This phenomenon of continual fluctuations in the number of counts per unit time, around a relatively fixed average value, is normally accounted for by assuming that the radioactive decay of any given atom is a random event, and the assumption that decay of a given atom occurs independently of the other atoms in the sample. Thus, each atom which has not yet decayed up to a certain moment in time, has a certain probability of decaying during the next minute—a probability which is fixed for any given isotope by the character of that isotope, and virtually independent of the temperature, chemical environment, and activity of neighboring atoms.

    An extraordinary phenomenon emerges, however, when we examine the fluctuations more carefully, with the help of a histogram: We fix a certain period of time (10 seconds, or a minute for example), and record the number of counts during each of a series of consecutive intervals of the given length. This gives us a sequence of whole numbers. We construct a histogram, by plotting the number of times a given whole number appears in the sequence, as a function of the number.

    Now, from the standpoint of simple statistics we would expect the histogram curve to have a simple bell shape, with a maximum around the number corresponding to the overall average number of counts, and then declining gradually on both sides. Naturally, if the number of measurements is small, the histogram will look more irregular, owing to the effect of random fluctuations; but we would expect that as we increase the total time of measurement, the curve would become closer and closer to the ideal mathematical bell curve.

    However, real measurements of radioactivity and many other processes, carried out by Shnoll and others over many years, give a completely different result! The histograms typically show several clearly defined peaks, which do not “smooth out” as we increase the number of measurements, but which actually become more and more pronounced!

    In four histograms, each plotting the results of 1,200 consecutive measurements of the radioactivity of a sample of the iron isotope Fe-55, over 36-second intervals, the largest peak corresponds to the average count, of about 31,500 pulses per 36 seconds; but there are a number of other peaks, which we can see emerging more and more clearly as we follow the cumulative results of the first 100, 200, 300, and so on, measurements as “layers” under the main curve (Figure 1).

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    Change in Shape over Time
    The histograms, made from more than two days from four successive 12-hour-long series of measurements, show another typical phenomenon discovered by Shnoll: The shapes of the histograms change over time (Figure 2). Most remarkably, the shapes of histograms for independent measurements taken over the same time period, tend to be very similar.

    For example, simultaneous measurement of the reaction rate of ascorbic acid, dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP), and beta activity of carbon-14 show histograms of very similar shape.

    These and a large number of other experiments carried out by Shnoll and his collaborators over many years, point unambiguously to the existence of a universal factor influencing the shapes of histograms, and which varies in time. Furthermore, the Russian researchers have discovered well-defined periods, over which similar histogram shapes tend to recur (Figure 3).

    To do this, they devised a computer-based algorithm for measuring the relative degree of “closeness” or similarity of histogram shapes, and on this basis carried out a computer analysis of hundreds of histograms taken over a long period. Examining the distribution of time intervals between “similar” histograms, they found strong peaks at 0 hours (that is, histograms made independently at the same time tend to be similar), at approximately 24 hours, at 27.28 days (probably corresponding to the synodic rotation of the Sun), and at three time intervals close to a year: 364.4, 365.2 and 366.6 days.

    More recent data, just reported to the author, indicate that the “24-hour” period is actually slightly shorter, and corresponds quite precisely to a sidereal day! The latter would suggest, that at least one astronomical factor influencing histogram shape may originate outside the solar system, being associated with the orientation of the measuring station relative to the galaxy, and not only relative to the Sun.

    Shnoll concludes: “From the data presented above, it follows that the ‘idea of shape’—the fine structure of distributions of results of measurements of processes of diverse nature—is determined by cosmological factors.” He does not put forward a definite hypothesis concerning the nature of the these factors, but suggests as a possibility the notion of a global “change of space-time structure,” and notes that “a sound analysis of such a hypothesis will possibly require experiments under different gravitational conditions.”

    Clearly, these results should be intensively followed up by scientists around the world.

    Jonathan Tennenbaum, based in Wiesbaden, Germany, is a member of the scientific advisory board of 21st Century Science & Technology magazine. He heads the Fusion Energy Foundation in Europe.

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    Observed Gravitational Wave Effects:
    Amaldi 1980 Frascati-Rome
    Classical Bar Detectors, 2013 Perth-London Zener-Diode
    Quantum Detectors, Earth Oscillation Mode Frequencies
    Reginald T. Cahill
    School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide 5001, Australia. E-mail: Reg.Cahill@flinders.edu.au

    Amaldi etal in 1981 reported two key discoveries from the Frascati and Rome gravitational wave cryogenic bar detectors:
    (a) Rome events delayed by within a few seconds to tens of seconds from the Frascati events, and (b) the Frascati Fourier-analysed data frequency peaks being the same as the earth oscillation frequencies from seismology. The time delay effects have been dismissed as being inconsistent with gravitational waves having speed c. However using data from zener diode quantum detectors, from Perth and London, for January 1-3, 2013, we report the same effects, and in excellent agreement with the Amaldi results. The time delay effects appear to be gravitational wave reverberations, recently observed, and for gravitational wave speeds of some 500km/s, as detected in numerous experiments. We conclude that the Amaldi et al. discoveries were very significant.

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