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Thread: Preferred cue tip..I've come full circle.

  1. #1
    Senior Member DiabloViejo's Avatar
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    Preferred cue tip..I've come full circle.

    Over the years I've experimented with all kinds of laminated tip brands, Moori, Hercules, Sniper, Tiger,Sting Ray,Talisman, and many others.

    Today I have a lathe and all the equipment to do my own cue maintenace. I also do tips for a few locals.

    I have a lot of fancy tips in stock and I can take my pick.

    So, what I'm about to tell you may come as a surprise..but I prefer plain old LePro tips for my cues. Some people will see this as blasphemy, but to each his own.

    I've heard about how LePro tips are unreliable and mushroom quickly, and how you only get a few tips out of a box that are any good. Well that's just not so.

    I have a box of LePros from which I have installed 40 tips. I have not had any complaints, and since most of my customers are good friends, I know they would tell me if they weren't happy. They haven't had problems with miscuing, mushrooming, premature wear, rot, or any of that. Out of the forty tips, I only had to replace one bad one. And that was one I'd installed on my own cue. Not bad for a tip that costs 50 cents.

    This brings me to the issue of price/value. A box of 50 LePros will run you about $24. Laminated tips will run you anywhere from $6.00 to $24.00 a piece.

    I can do anything with a LePro that I could do with the best laminated brand tips. Draw? Yep. Follow? Yep. Stop/Stun? Yep. Spin? Yep? Kick? Yep. Bank? Yep.

    Anything that can be done with a $24 cue tip can be done with a LePro. No tip is going to give you a stroke or give you skills you don't already have.

    Now on the other hand, I'm not knocking those folks who like laminated tips. If they work for you, then by all means have at it.


  2. #2
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    Are lepro's a 1-layer true leather tip??
    Water buffalo i suppoze.
    Or are they a concrete faux-leather tip?? (ie cemented shredded leather, like elks and diamonds and brunswicks, but dark-brown not grey).
    I hav uzed lepros -- they are probly 95% ok in larger sizes (eg 11mm), but praps only 90% ok when a smaller sizes (eg when turned down to 9.5mm).
    mac.

  3. #3
    Senior Member DiabloViejo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cushioncrawler View Post
    Are lepro's a 1-layer true leather tip?? Yes, one piece leather construction.
    Water buffalo i suppoze. No, they are cowhide.
    Or are they a concrete faux-leather tip?? (ie cemented shredded leather, like elks and diamonds and brunswicks, but dark-brown not grey).
    I hav uzed lepros -- they are probly 95% ok in larger sizes (eg 11mm), but praps only 90% ok when a smaller sizes (eg when turned down to 9.5mm).
    mac.
    Elkmaster tips are not made from reconstituted leather they are one piece leather tips, as are Le Pro and Triangle tips. Elkmasters are chalk impregnated. Elks are soft tips, Le Pros are medium hard, and Triangles are hard tips.


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    I am fairly sure that no tips are impregnated with chalk. There iz no reason to. It kood only hurt. What possible good kood it do???
    Brunswick tips are suppozedly chalk infuzed or something, baloney, they simply tumble the tips in a barrel of chalk-blocks to knock ruff edges off.
    I am fairly sure that elks and diamonds are cemented shredded leather.
    Sometimes theze sorts of tips hav a lean -- obviously due to the green tip leaning before the cement haz gained initial set.
    I suspekt that pigskin makes better tips than cow/buffalo -- but praps it iz just that thin layers work best, in which case layered cow/buffalo might be better than a single layer (ie uzing thinner skin).

    But getting back to lepro's, i did sense a slight slippage and loss of skrew in the smaller (9.5mm) sizes. However i must admit that theze small lepro's were very fat, koz they had been turned down from 13mm, but retaining much of the initial depth, praps too much, karnt remember exaktly. I remember that some of theze small lepro's failed by shear, a large chunk broke off, probly koz the tips were too fat for their size.
    mac.
    Last edited by cushioncrawler; 03-05-2014 at 11:54 PM.

  5. #5
    The thing I like about layered tips is, you dont have to replace em as often.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bambu View Post
    The thing I like about layered tips is, you dont have to replace em as often.
    U iz talking about thin layers of pigskin I guess. Thin layers of cow/buffalo mightn't be az good az pigskin, nor az longlasting.
    mac.

  7. #7
    Senior Member DiabloViejo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bambu View Post
    The thing I like about layered tips is, you dont have to replace em as often.
    That's true but it's not a problem for me since I have a lathe at home.

    I installed a Sting Ray tip on my friend's cue over five years ago and it's still perfectly good to go. He uses the cue two or three times a week. He never scuffs it or shapes it and it has maintained its shape and thickness all that time. He does use a tip pik on occasion but that's about it. You don't hear any buzz about Sting Rays, but they're pretty good hard layered tips.


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    Tweeten apparently deny that they uze cemented shredded leather (or leather fines or leather offcuts or ground leather or leather flour or synthetic leather) for Elk Master tips. But sharp snooker hav the following description....

    ....Pro Granite tips is made using Water Buffalo hide. Blue Diamond tips are also made with Water Buffalo hide, both types of tip are made with compressed leather fibres and bonded together with a binding solution ( glue/resin ) Pro Granite tips are put together with a stronger binding solution, the end product is well pressed and shaped and very consistent...... - See more at: http://sharpsnooker.com.au/products/....7p0sNDVg.dpuf

    Bonded together -- this wording suggests more than just soaking.
    I still suspect that Elks (and Diamonds and Brunswicks etc) are cemented shredded leather.
    mac.

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    I did the same thing on my last install, I put on a Lepro a good 6 months ago. I've been using Moori tips for over 10 years and even have an aging stock of them, along with various other layered tips. I bet my Lepro tip hasn't worn a third down, so it is wearing about the same as my Moori Hard tips. It is odd that my first McDermott cues came with Lepro tips, and even though I shoot with a custom cue now, I finally went back to a Lepro. There's hardly any tip I haven't tried yet I came back full circle also. Go figure. We "anal-ize" tips way too much IMO.
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room!"

  10. #10
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    The softer tips tend to flatten out more and will require more maintenance over a longer period of time. In contrast, the hard tips last longer period of time and will require less maintenance. Pool equipment requires a great deal of personal preference and comfort to be utilized effectively by the individual.

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