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Thread: Jb ultimate rugged cases?

  1. #11
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    Damn, this morning i realized that the Daleks kood eezyly outsmart me.
    If they put the poolhall in a very big spinning artificial-g space-station, my 3 scales would show gravity, whilst in fakt it iz radial-inertia. Einstein didn't ever mention radial-inertia -- it took the Daleks to think of it. So now i havta think some more. I will be back.
    mac.

    Got it. Took me 30seconds. Coriolis.
    If i dangle a scale on a wire & lift the scale off the floor, if the poolhall iz in a spinning artificial-g space-station then the scale's dangle-angle will be off vertical (momentaryly at least). Here Coriolis will tell me whether Daleks are messing with the poolhall, & will tell me which direction the space-station iz spinning. Coriolis iz bad news for pool balls & for Daleks.

    Hey, while i woz writing that stuff, i thort of a second test.
    If the pooltable iz perfiktly level, & perfiktly flat, then if in an artificial-g space-station, the pool balls will roll off left&right, but not when going up'n'down the centreline (depending on table orientation).

    This meens that Brunswick will havta make some tables with a cylindrical kurv in the slate.
    The kurv kood be along the centreline or across the centreline, depending on the intended orientation inside the space-station. My bet iz that they stuffup and all the tables will hav the wrong kurv.

    Damn, penny just dropped, the Daleks would hav twigged that i might cotton-on to that kurved slate & roll-off bizness.
    The Daleks would hav made a table with a kurved slate so that ball-rolloff would not occur. Anyhow i kan still outsmartem. I kan check the table az it iz, then turn the table 90dg and test for rolloff again. Yep, i think i am ready now.

    Az George Bush sayd, "bringem on", and he allso sayd, "well u Daleks havta ask yourselfs, are u feeling lucky, well, are ya, punks".
    mac.
    Last edited by cushioncrawler; 05-09-2014 at 04:23 PM.

  2. #12
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    The phrase 'cotton on to', with the above meaning, appears to be limited in usage to the UK and other countries that were previously part of the British Empire, notably Australia and New Zealand. In the USA, especially in the southern states, 'cotton to' is used, with the slightly modified meaning of 'take a liking to'.

    As early as 1648, in a pamphlet titled Mercurius Elencticus, mocking the English parliament, the royalist soldier and poet Sir George Wharton used 'cotton', or as it was spelled then 'cotten', as a verb meaning 'to make friendly advances'. 'Cotten up to' and 'cotten to' were both used to mean 'become friendly with'. Whether this was as a reference to the rather annoying predisposition of moist raw cotton to stick to things or whether it alluded to moving of cotton garments closer together during a romantic advance isn't clear. John Camden Hotten, in his Slang Dictionary, 1869, opted for the former derivation:

    Cotton, to like, adhere to, or agree with any person; "to COTTON on to a man," to attach yourself to him, or fancy him, literally, to stick to him as cotton would.

    The number of citations that use 'cottening' in a courtship context and the use of the 'cottening up' variant would suggest the latter is more likely; for example, William Congreave's comic play Love for Love, 1695:

    I love to see 'em hug and cotten together, like Down upon a Thistle.

    The attaching of cotton strands to the bobbins of weaving looms is sometimes also cited as a source of 'cottoning on', but there appears to be no basis for that notion. None of the early citations of the phrase mention that context.

    'Cottoning on' as we now use it derives from the meaning of 'attaching oneself to something', specifically an attachment to an idea that we haven't encountered before. It would seem to be a reasonable bet that at least one of the variants of this phrase would have been coined in one of the major English-speaking cotton producing regions of the world, for example India or the USA. Not so; which gives more credibility to the notion that this phrase has little to do with the cotton plant. 'Cotton to' was coined in the UK and the first widespread uses of 'cotton on to' were in New Zealand and Australia. The earliest example that I can find of this is from the New South Wales newspaper The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser, March 1883, reporting on a local horse race:

    A lot [of backers] then cottoned on to Sahara, who was a strong favourite.

    This citation was closely followed by a reference in a New Zealand newspaper The Wanganui Herald, June 1893:

    The Kaierau forwards are just beginnng to cotton on to the passing game.

    It seems that 'cotton to', 'cotton on to' all derive from the same root source, that is, the verb 'to cotton'. In the UK and its antipodes it has settled down as 'cotton on to', with the meaning 'form an understanding of' and in the USA it is 'cotton to', with the 'take a liking to' meaning.

    See also: the meaning and origin of 'cotton-picking'.

  3. #13
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    Re: Hadn't twigged
    Posted by David FG on March 24, 2011 at 21:42
    In Reply to: Re: Hadn't twigged posted by James Briggs on March 22, 2011 at 11:47:
    : : What's the origin of the phrase "hadn't twigged", meaning: had not realised?

    : Twig is derived from the Irish word "tuigim" meaning "I understand".

    The Irish origin is one theory, it is true. If it is the correct one, it would make this rather obscure little verb very unusual. Words adopted into English from Irish are very rare, and the majority of the few are nouns (whiskey/whisky, smithereens, shilelagh and so on) with 'galore' being a notable exception.
    Off hand I can't think of a single verb (certainly not one in common use) that has made the cross-over.
    I think the safest explanation of the origin of 'to twig' is the time-honoured 'uncertain'.
    DFG
    Last edited by cushioncrawler; 05-07-2014 at 06:39 PM.

  4. #14
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    The penny drops
    Meaning
    A belated realization of something after a period of confusion or ignorance.
    Origin
    penny in the slotThe Oxford English Dictionary states that this phrase originated by way of allusion to the mechanism of penny-in-the-slot machines. The OED's earliest citation of a use of the phrase with the 'now I understand' meaning, is from The Daily Mirror August 1939:
    And then the penny dropped, and I saw his meaning!

    The image of someone waiting for a penny-in-the-slot mechanism (which often jammed) to operate does sound plausible and, if that isn't the origin, it is difficult to imagine what is.

    British public toilets in 1939 required users to 'spend a penny' in order to unlock the door to get in and that has given rise to speculation that that is the source of the phrase. There's no evidence to support that theory though. Likewise the theory that the expression originated with the 'Button A/Button B' style of telephone boxes, which used coins as payment for calls and which were also in use in 1939.

    Earlier citations, which make literal reference to actual coins and which are likely precursors of the later figurative use of the phrase, appear in print in the USA from the early 20th century; for example, this piece from the Maryland newspaper, The Daily News, November 1921:
    The penny dropped [into the weighing scales], the needle started around the figures, and stopped this time on 150.

  5. #15
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    ............Hey, while i woz writing that stuff, i thort of a second test.
    If the pooltable iz perfiktly level, & perfiktly flat, then if in an artificial-g space-station, the pool balls will roll off left&right, but not when going up'n'down the centreline (depending on table orientation).

    ............This meens that Brunswick will havta make some tables with a cylindrical kurv in the slate.
    The kurv kood be along the centreline or across the centreline, depending on the intended orientation inside the space-station. My bet iz that they stuffup and all the tables will hav the wrong kurv.

    ............Damn, penny just dropped, the Daleks would hav twigged that i might cotton-on to that kurved slate & roll-off bizness.
    The Daleks would hav made a table with a kurved slate so that ball-rolloff would not occur. Anyhow i kan still outsmartem. I kan check the table az it iz, then turn the table 90dg and test for rolloff again. Yep, i think i am ready now ......................... ..................... .................. ........................... ........ .......... ............... .......... ................ .......... .......... .............. ........... ..........

    Just realized, praps Earth woz made by Daleks. Earth iz a space-station, and Brunswick iz run by Daleks. And all of our pool-tables hav a concave surface, to fool us.
    mac.
    Last edited by cushioncrawler; 05-10-2014 at 06:53 PM.

  6. #16
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    I do not believe anyone plays pool in space.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladimir Ulyanov View Post
    I do not believe anyone plays pool in space.
    DarkMatter, DarkEnergy, DarkFlow, BlackHoles --- there are zero of theze in space, they don't exist.
    But if asked if there are black balls in space, the answer will be that they havnt seen any, and that they karnt see DarkMatter, but they would see black balls.
    Go figure.
    Hell, every large body in space iz a solid spheroid. Az are most black balls.
    mac.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cushioncrawler View Post
    DarkMatter, DarkEnergy, DarkFlow, BlackHoles --- there are zero of theze in space, they don't exist.
    But if asked if there are black balls in space, the answer will be that they havnt seen any, and that they karnt see DarkMatter, but they would see black balls.
    Go figure.
    Hell, every large body in space iz a solid spheroid. Az are most black balls.
    mac.
    Mac I commend you on being the only long time member still posting that tries to have truly civil discussions.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladimir Ulyanov View Post
    Mac I commend you on being the only long time member still posting that tries to have truly civil discussions.
    Eezypeezy, after all i woz a Civil Engineer all my working life. Civil, but insane.
    mac.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by cushioncrawler View Post
    Eezypeezy, after all i woz a Civil Engineer all my working life. Civil, but insane.
    mac.
    Quite civil then tovarisch.

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