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Thread: going pro

  1. #1
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    going pro

    I'm a 16 year old poolshooter, and I've gotten rather serious with pool shooting. I was wondering how to get on the pro league when the time is right. Is there some kind of tournament, or do you just get scouted into the league.

  2. #2
    Guest

    Re: going pro

    Hey, cool, I'm also 16. I'm certainly no expert about this, but I'll give it a shot. I don't think there really is a "pro league" for pool. I think you just have to do well at major tournaments like Derby City Classic and then you'll get into bigger, professional tournaments. By the way what area do you live in?

  3. #3

    Re: going pro

    The simplest way to go pro is to give Charlie Williams $100. He will make you a pro. It doesn't matter how you play. I saw him offer to sign up a woman who plays at barely a C+ level and he said just give him the $100.

    It doesn't matter if you are in the top 500 or the top 5,000 best players in the world, you will be guaranteed a place in any pro tournament that gives CW $1,000 for the honor of being sanctified.

    He can barely get 32 players to enter his own tournaments so I'm sure you could get one of the 32 spots he insists on for his members.

    I don't understand why any promoter would put up with that and I am boycotting any tournament that is sanctioned by the UPA. Never fear, there are enough suckers who will pay to go watch the 500th best player in the world because CW says he is a professional. Actually, barely 20 players make a profit in the business let alone make a living.
    BW

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Re: going pro

    "Pro" and "League" do NOT go together. In reality, anyone can call him/herself a "pro" by simply paying the entry fee. The UPA and the Western Pechauer Tour (among others) have an association fee along with tournament entry fees.

    Be aware however that very, very few poolplayers actually make a living playing pool. It may sound glamorous to hear about "so-n-so" winning tens of thousands at a given event, but you need to consider all the expenses and the simple fact that winning is extremely inconsistent.

    Heed some advise --- Pursue your education, including college. Treat pool as an avocation rather than a possible vocation. If you can make a few dollars at pool, great, but you'll have other skills to rely on with an education.

    Troy
    <blockquote><font class="small">Quote eyez6r9glazed:</font><hr> I'm a 16 year old poolshooter, and I've gotten rather serious with pool shooting. I was wondering how to get on the pro league when the time is right. Is there some kind of tournament, or do you just get scouted into the league. <hr /></blockquote>

  5. #5
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    louisville kentucky
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    listen

    ditto here
    the road and the tours are nothing but travel, expenses and a neverending need to win,
    so school and education are alway going to be with you. remember, you will get old sometime, and without thinking and dealing with your life out in the distance you will always be wondering what happened to me, why isnt my life better.


  6. #6
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    Re: going pro

    Men's professional pool, at the moment, does not have a "tour" or a governing body that sets any standards for what qualifies someone as being a "pro". In order to get into a pro event all you have to do is pay your entry fee to the promoter and show up. I have to agree with some of the other posters... get an education (and I don't mean the school of hard knocks at the pool room). I have been going to pro events as a vendor of custom cues for a few years now and I have seen first hand how difficult it is to make a living as a pool player. If nothing else, learn a trade (in school) that will carry over into the billiard industry. Manufacturers, retailers and the like are the only ones in the business making a decent living. Most of the pro players I know are supplementing their income by buying and selling cues, cases and other merchandise. I don't mean top 100 players... I mean top 5. It's brutal. God knows that the one thing this sport needs most is leadership. Get interested in the politics of the industry. Learn who the behind the scenes players are and try to figure out what you can do to improve the sport in the future. There is money to be made in pool but it's not in the playing... it's in the business end. Good luck.

    Vicki

  7. #7
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    455

    Re: going pro

    One good way to go about it is lose everything you have now. Sleep in poolrooms, scam people out of money, lose that to people who scam you. Get robbed (not on the pool table, but in the parking lot) and take a lot of risks. Learn a lot. In a few years take a look at the players who you have no hope of beating now. I'm saying real good local players. If you can give them the 5 and the break for all the money you have and break them everytime, you might be getting close. [img]/ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img] Then go play for the rent against a real strong player and see how it goes. And no backers, that takes away too much pressure. I'm saying if you lose you don't have a place to live, a car, or food. I'm exaggerating a little, but not by a whole lot. Going pro is generally a proposition for those who can't do anything else.

    In other words, if you have to ask how to be a pro, you are nowhere close to being ready and shouldn't even think about it. Do other stuff and build a life. If you are good enough to play pool for a living you will know it. It won't be something you want to do, but something you have to do.

    Here's one little story I read recently that you should check out. I started playing in Denver. The best player from there by far can't afford to take himself to tournaments. This article had him talking about how he couldn't afford to go to the U.S. Open. And he can win pro events. I am not in the top 10 in what I do for a living but I live in a nice house, have some cash in the bank, and could go to any pool tournament in the US if I wanted to. I mean, it doesn't cost more than a couple grand to get there, get entered, and stay in a fleabag. Pool playing is a real bad life for most who try it. The ones who succeed don't care though. Good Luck.

  8. #8
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    Re: going pro

    switch to Snooker if you have the skill

    Plenty of money in that

  9. #9
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    Re: going pro

    <blockquote><font class="small">Quote eyez6r9glazed:</font><hr> I'm a 16 year old poolshooter, and I've gotten rather serious with pool shooting. I was wondering how to get on the pro league when the time is right. Is there some kind of tournament, or do you just get scouted into the league. <hr /></blockquote>
    You obviously don't know a lot about pro pool. Pro pool players are not scouted and drafted like pro baseball, football and basketball players. No one offers you a multi million dollar contract to play pool. It just doesn't work that way. Maybe some day in all of our wildest dreams, it will.
    For now, read the other posts in this thread and follow some very good advise, especially the ones advising you to get an education and build a career.

  10. #10
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    Re: going pro

    <blockquote><font class="small">Quote JPB:</font><hr>

    ....Here's one little story I read recently that you should check out. I started playing in Denver. The best player from there by far can't afford to take himself to tournaments. This article had him talking about how he couldn't afford to go to the U.S. Open. And he can win pro events..... <hr /></blockquote>

    Max Eberle I believe.

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